Role of Microparticles in Cardiovascular Disease: Implications for Endothelial Dysfunction, Thrombosis, and Inflammation

Leslie Marisol Lugo-Gavidia, Dylan Burger, Vance B. Matthews, Janis M. Nolde, Márcio Galindo Kiuchi, Revathy Carnagarin, Dennis Kannenkeril, Justine Chan, Anu Joyson, Lakshini Y. Herat, Omar Azzam, Markus P. Schlaich

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microparticles are small cell vesicles that are derived from the cell membrane in response to different biological processes. There is growing evidence supporting the association between microparticles and cardiovascular disease, as their pathophysiology commonly includes endothelial damage and chronic inflammation which also promote a prothrombotic state. The direct causal link between the release of the different subtypes of microparticles and their implications on physiological and pathological conditions is still not completely elucidated. However, evidence suggests microparticles released from platelets, leukocytes, and endothelium may help to evaluate vascular health as they have a relevant role in inflammation, endothelial function, and thrombosis. This review aims to provide a short overview of the biogenesis, characteristics, and detection methodology of microparticles with a special focus on their possible implication in cardiovascular settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1825-1844
Number of pages20
JournalHypertension
Volume77
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Role of Microparticles in Cardiovascular Disease: Implications for Endothelial Dysfunction, Thrombosis, and Inflammation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this