Responses of nitrification and ammonia oxidizers to a range of background and adjusted pH in purple soils

Zhihui Wang, Yao Meng, Xia Zhu-Barker, Xinhua He, William R. Horwath, Hongyan Luo, Yongpeng Zhao, Xianjun Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Soil pH is often changed by anthropogenic activities such as agronomic management, land use or acidifying pollution, and is widely considered to be a dominant factor affecting soil nitrogen cycling. In this study, three purple soils originating from similar parent materials but varying in pH (5.7, 7.3, and 8.0), representing acidic, neutral and alkaline soils, were selected to determine the effect of background pH on net nitrification rate (NNR) and ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB). The background pH of each soil was modified to the pH of the other soils to investigate the effect of adjusted pH on NNR and ammonia oxidizers. Net nitrification rates varied significantly with adjusted pH in neutral soils but did not change in acidic and alkaline soils, suggesting that soil at neutral pH is more sensitive to changes in nitrification. The AOB abundance increased in neutral soils adjusted to high pH, whereas AOA decreased with increased pH in acidic and neutral soils, which indicated that the activity and abundance of AOA and AOB is the more important factor affecting nitrification in neutral soils. The ratios of AOA to AOB in the unmodified acidic, neutral and alkaline soils were 120, 1.55 and 0.07, respectively. The highest AOA and AOB abundances occurred in unmodified pH neutral soil. However, the highest NNR was found in alkaline soils (7.04 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1)), which was significantly higher than that in neutral and acidic soils (2.31 and - 0.23 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1), respectively). These results indicate that substrate competition between AOA and AOB exists in neutral soils, which can provide insight and improve our understanding of microbial regulation of N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-14
Number of pages6
JournalGeoderma
Volume334
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2019

Cite this

Wang, Zhihui ; Meng, Yao ; Zhu-Barker, Xia ; He, Xinhua ; Horwath, William R. ; Luo, Hongyan ; Zhao, Yongpeng ; Jiang, Xianjun. / Responses of nitrification and ammonia oxidizers to a range of background and adjusted pH in purple soils. In: Geoderma. 2019 ; Vol. 334. pp. 9-14.
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abstract = "Soil pH is often changed by anthropogenic activities such as agronomic management, land use or acidifying pollution, and is widely considered to be a dominant factor affecting soil nitrogen cycling. In this study, three purple soils originating from similar parent materials but varying in pH (5.7, 7.3, and 8.0), representing acidic, neutral and alkaline soils, were selected to determine the effect of background pH on net nitrification rate (NNR) and ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB). The background pH of each soil was modified to the pH of the other soils to investigate the effect of adjusted pH on NNR and ammonia oxidizers. Net nitrification rates varied significantly with adjusted pH in neutral soils but did not change in acidic and alkaline soils, suggesting that soil at neutral pH is more sensitive to changes in nitrification. The AOB abundance increased in neutral soils adjusted to high pH, whereas AOA decreased with increased pH in acidic and neutral soils, which indicated that the activity and abundance of AOA and AOB is the more important factor affecting nitrification in neutral soils. The ratios of AOA to AOB in the unmodified acidic, neutral and alkaline soils were 120, 1.55 and 0.07, respectively. The highest AOA and AOB abundances occurred in unmodified pH neutral soil. However, the highest NNR was found in alkaline soils (7.04 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1)), which was significantly higher than that in neutral and acidic soils (2.31 and - 0.23 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1), respectively). These results indicate that substrate competition between AOA and AOB exists in neutral soils, which can provide insight and improve our understanding of microbial regulation of N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.",
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Responses of nitrification and ammonia oxidizers to a range of background and adjusted pH in purple soils. / Wang, Zhihui; Meng, Yao; Zhu-Barker, Xia; He, Xinhua; Horwath, William R.; Luo, Hongyan; Zhao, Yongpeng; Jiang, Xianjun.

In: Geoderma, Vol. 334, 15.01.2019, p. 9-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Responses of nitrification and ammonia oxidizers to a range of background and adjusted pH in purple soils

AU - Wang, Zhihui

AU - Meng, Yao

AU - Zhu-Barker, Xia

AU - He, Xinhua

AU - Horwath, William R.

AU - Luo, Hongyan

AU - Zhao, Yongpeng

AU - Jiang, Xianjun

PY - 2019/1/15

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N2 - Soil pH is often changed by anthropogenic activities such as agronomic management, land use or acidifying pollution, and is widely considered to be a dominant factor affecting soil nitrogen cycling. In this study, three purple soils originating from similar parent materials but varying in pH (5.7, 7.3, and 8.0), representing acidic, neutral and alkaline soils, were selected to determine the effect of background pH on net nitrification rate (NNR) and ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB). The background pH of each soil was modified to the pH of the other soils to investigate the effect of adjusted pH on NNR and ammonia oxidizers. Net nitrification rates varied significantly with adjusted pH in neutral soils but did not change in acidic and alkaline soils, suggesting that soil at neutral pH is more sensitive to changes in nitrification. The AOB abundance increased in neutral soils adjusted to high pH, whereas AOA decreased with increased pH in acidic and neutral soils, which indicated that the activity and abundance of AOA and AOB is the more important factor affecting nitrification in neutral soils. The ratios of AOA to AOB in the unmodified acidic, neutral and alkaline soils were 120, 1.55 and 0.07, respectively. The highest AOA and AOB abundances occurred in unmodified pH neutral soil. However, the highest NNR was found in alkaline soils (7.04 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1)), which was significantly higher than that in neutral and acidic soils (2.31 and - 0.23 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1), respectively). These results indicate that substrate competition between AOA and AOB exists in neutral soils, which can provide insight and improve our understanding of microbial regulation of N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.

AB - Soil pH is often changed by anthropogenic activities such as agronomic management, land use or acidifying pollution, and is widely considered to be a dominant factor affecting soil nitrogen cycling. In this study, three purple soils originating from similar parent materials but varying in pH (5.7, 7.3, and 8.0), representing acidic, neutral and alkaline soils, were selected to determine the effect of background pH on net nitrification rate (NNR) and ammonia oxidizers (AOA and AOB). The background pH of each soil was modified to the pH of the other soils to investigate the effect of adjusted pH on NNR and ammonia oxidizers. Net nitrification rates varied significantly with adjusted pH in neutral soils but did not change in acidic and alkaline soils, suggesting that soil at neutral pH is more sensitive to changes in nitrification. The AOB abundance increased in neutral soils adjusted to high pH, whereas AOA decreased with increased pH in acidic and neutral soils, which indicated that the activity and abundance of AOA and AOB is the more important factor affecting nitrification in neutral soils. The ratios of AOA to AOB in the unmodified acidic, neutral and alkaline soils were 120, 1.55 and 0.07, respectively. The highest AOA and AOB abundances occurred in unmodified pH neutral soil. However, the highest NNR was found in alkaline soils (7.04 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1)), which was significantly higher than that in neutral and acidic soils (2.31 and - 0.23 mg N kg(-1) dry soil d(-1), respectively). These results indicate that substrate competition between AOA and AOB exists in neutral soils, which can provide insight and improve our understanding of microbial regulation of N cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.

KW - Nitrification

KW - AOA

KW - AOB

KW - Acidic soil

KW - Neutral soil

KW - Alkaline soil

KW - LONG-TERM FERTILIZATION

KW - PINE FOREST SOILS

KW - COMMUNITY STRUCTURE

KW - NICHE SPECIALIZATION

KW - AGRICULTURAL SOILS

KW - BACTERIA RATHER

KW - ACIDIC SOILS

KW - PADDY SOILS

KW - ARCHAEA

KW - OXIDATION

U2 - 10.1016/j.geoderma.2018.07.038

DO - 10.1016/j.geoderma.2018.07.038

M3 - Article

VL - 334

SP - 9

EP - 14

JO - Geoderma

JF - Geoderma

SN - 0016-7061

ER -