Reptiles of the northern jarrah forest - implications for the conservation of common, uncommon and rare species on a production landscape in south-western Australia

Maggie Triska

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    Abstract

    [Truncated] Restoration is an increasingly important tool used to reduce the impact of human activities on ecosystems and to maintain or increase populations of flora and fauna. While much of the focus in restoration is on vegetation recovery, the importance of fauna in restoration is increasingly recognized. The northern Jarrah forest in south-western Australia is located within a biodiversity hotspot and contains high reptile diversity, approximately 45 species. There is little information on the majority of reptile species’ life history, behaviour or habitat requirements in the Jarrah forest.
    This study was completed at a bauxite mine, within the Jarrah forest, which contains small patches (mean ~20 ha) of varying restoration ages within a reference forest (unmined) matrix. I utilized survey data (collected from 2005-2012) on reptile and vegetation structure in reference and restored sites to assess the potential effects of restoration on common, uncommon and rare reptile species. I identified reptile habitat requirements using occupancy modelling, binomial regression and non-metric multidimensional scaling (Chapter 2), identified potential barriers to reptile recolonisation of restoration using variance and hierarchical partitioning (Chapter 3) and generated models to predict the potential impacts of mining on the predicted proportion of habitat available for reptiles over time (Chapter 4). I was able to determine habitat requirements for common and uncommon species and general habitat associations for rare species.
    LanguageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    StateUnpublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    rare species
    reptile
    habitat
    fauna
    bauxite
    vegetation structure
    recolonization
    restoration
    life history
    flora
    human activity
    partitioning
    biodiversity
    matrix
    ecosystem
    vegetation
    modeling

    Cite this

    @phdthesis{57ec999f30ed41ddbf7448a3d4a52ae4,
    title = "Reptiles of the northern jarrah forest - implications for the conservation of common, uncommon and rare species on a production landscape in south-western Australia",
    abstract = "[Truncated] Restoration is an increasingly important tool used to reduce the impact of human activities on ecosystems and to maintain or increase populations of flora and fauna. While much of the focus in restoration is on vegetation recovery, the importance of fauna in restoration is increasingly recognized. The northern Jarrah forest in south-western Australia is located within a biodiversity hotspot and contains high reptile diversity, approximately 45 species. There is little information on the majority of reptile species’ life history, behaviour or habitat requirements in the Jarrah forest. This study was completed at a bauxite mine, within the Jarrah forest, which contains small patches (mean ~20 ha) of varying restoration ages within a reference forest (unmined) matrix. I utilized survey data (collected from 2005-2012) on reptile and vegetation structure in reference and restored sites to assess the potential effects of restoration on common, uncommon and rare reptile species. I identified reptile habitat requirements using occupancy modelling, binomial regression and non-metric multidimensional scaling (Chapter 2), identified potential barriers to reptile recolonisation of restoration using variance and hierarchical partitioning (Chapter 3) and generated models to predict the potential impacts of mining on the predicted proportion of habitat available for reptiles over time (Chapter 4). I was able to determine habitat requirements for common and uncommon species and general habitat associations for rare species.",
    keywords = "Restoration ecology, Reptile surveys, Habitat management, Habitat suitability models, Skinks",
    author = "Maggie Triska",
    year = "2014",
    language = "English",

    }

    TY - THES

    T1 - Reptiles of the northern jarrah forest - implications for the conservation of common, uncommon and rare species on a production landscape in south-western Australia

    AU - Triska,Maggie

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - [Truncated] Restoration is an increasingly important tool used to reduce the impact of human activities on ecosystems and to maintain or increase populations of flora and fauna. While much of the focus in restoration is on vegetation recovery, the importance of fauna in restoration is increasingly recognized. The northern Jarrah forest in south-western Australia is located within a biodiversity hotspot and contains high reptile diversity, approximately 45 species. There is little information on the majority of reptile species’ life history, behaviour or habitat requirements in the Jarrah forest. This study was completed at a bauxite mine, within the Jarrah forest, which contains small patches (mean ~20 ha) of varying restoration ages within a reference forest (unmined) matrix. I utilized survey data (collected from 2005-2012) on reptile and vegetation structure in reference and restored sites to assess the potential effects of restoration on common, uncommon and rare reptile species. I identified reptile habitat requirements using occupancy modelling, binomial regression and non-metric multidimensional scaling (Chapter 2), identified potential barriers to reptile recolonisation of restoration using variance and hierarchical partitioning (Chapter 3) and generated models to predict the potential impacts of mining on the predicted proportion of habitat available for reptiles over time (Chapter 4). I was able to determine habitat requirements for common and uncommon species and general habitat associations for rare species.

    AB - [Truncated] Restoration is an increasingly important tool used to reduce the impact of human activities on ecosystems and to maintain or increase populations of flora and fauna. While much of the focus in restoration is on vegetation recovery, the importance of fauna in restoration is increasingly recognized. The northern Jarrah forest in south-western Australia is located within a biodiversity hotspot and contains high reptile diversity, approximately 45 species. There is little information on the majority of reptile species’ life history, behaviour or habitat requirements in the Jarrah forest. This study was completed at a bauxite mine, within the Jarrah forest, which contains small patches (mean ~20 ha) of varying restoration ages within a reference forest (unmined) matrix. I utilized survey data (collected from 2005-2012) on reptile and vegetation structure in reference and restored sites to assess the potential effects of restoration on common, uncommon and rare reptile species. I identified reptile habitat requirements using occupancy modelling, binomial regression and non-metric multidimensional scaling (Chapter 2), identified potential barriers to reptile recolonisation of restoration using variance and hierarchical partitioning (Chapter 3) and generated models to predict the potential impacts of mining on the predicted proportion of habitat available for reptiles over time (Chapter 4). I was able to determine habitat requirements for common and uncommon species and general habitat associations for rare species.

    KW - Restoration ecology

    KW - Reptile surveys

    KW - Habitat management

    KW - Habitat suitability models

    KW - Skinks

    M3 - Doctoral Thesis

    ER -