Repetition Suppression in Ventral Visual Cortex Is Diminished as a Function of Increasing Autistic Traits

M. P. Ewbank, Gillian Rhodes, E. A. H. Von Dem Hagen, T. E. Powell, N. Bright, R. S. Stoyanova, S. Baron-Cohen, Andrew Calder

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Abstract

Repeated viewing of a stimulus causes a change in perceptual sensitivity, known as a visual aftereffect. Similarly, in neuroimaging, repetitions of the same stimulus result in a reduction in the neural response, known as repetition suppression (RS). Previous research shows that aftereffects for faces are reduced in both children with autism and in first-degree relatives. With functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the magnitude of RS to faces in neurotypical participants was negatively correlated with individual differences in autistic traits. We replicated this finding in a second experiment, while additional experiments showed that autistic traits also negatively predicted RS to images of scenes and simple geometric shapes. These findings suggest that a core aspect of neural function—the brain's response to repetition—is modulated by autistic traits.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3381–3393
Number of pages13
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

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Visual Cortex
Autistic Disorder
Individuality
Neuroimaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Research

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Ewbank, M. P., Rhodes, G., Von Dem Hagen, E. A. H., Powell, T. E., Bright, N., Stoyanova, R. S., ... Calder, A. (2015). Repetition Suppression in Ventral Visual Cortex Is Diminished as a Function of Increasing Autistic Traits. Cerebral Cortex, 25(10), 3381–3393. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhu149
Ewbank, M. P. ; Rhodes, Gillian ; Von Dem Hagen, E. A. H. ; Powell, T. E. ; Bright, N. ; Stoyanova, R. S. ; Baron-Cohen, S. ; Calder, Andrew. / Repetition Suppression in Ventral Visual Cortex Is Diminished as a Function of Increasing Autistic Traits. In: Cerebral Cortex. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 3381–3393.
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Ewbank, MP, Rhodes, G, Von Dem Hagen, EAH, Powell, TE, Bright, N, Stoyanova, RS, Baron-Cohen, S & Calder, A 2015, 'Repetition Suppression in Ventral Visual Cortex Is Diminished as a Function of Increasing Autistic Traits' Cerebral Cortex, vol. 25, no. 10, pp. 3381–3393. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhu149

Repetition Suppression in Ventral Visual Cortex Is Diminished as a Function of Increasing Autistic Traits. / Ewbank, M. P.; Rhodes, Gillian; Von Dem Hagen, E. A. H.; Powell, T. E.; Bright, N.; Stoyanova, R. S.; Baron-Cohen, S.; Calder, Andrew.

In: Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 25, No. 10, 10.2015, p. 3381–3393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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