Repeated Long-Term Sub-concussion Impacts Induce Motor Dysfunction in Rats: A Potential Rodent Model

Andrew P. Lavender, Samuel Rawlings, Andrew Warnock, Terry McGonigle, Bailey Hiles-Murison, Michael Nesbit, Virginie Lam, Mark J. Hackett, Melinda Fitzgerald, Ryusuke Takechi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whilst detrimental effects of repeated sub-concussive impacts on neurophysiological and behavioral function are increasingly reported, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that repeated sub-concussion with a light weight drop (25 g) in wild-type PVG rats for 2 weeks does not induce detectable neuromotor dysfunction assessed by beamwalk and rotarod tests. However, after 12 weeks of repeated sub-concussion, the rats exhibited moderate neuromotor dysfunction. This is the first study to demonstrate development of neuromotor dysfunction following multiple long-term sub-concussive impacts in rats. The outcomes may offer significant opportunity for future studies to understand the mechanisms of sub-concussion-induced neuropsychological changes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number491
JournalFrontiers in Neurology
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2020

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