Renal Trauma in Australian Rules Football: An Institutional Experience

S. Lee, J. Thavaseelan, Vincent Low

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Australian rules football is the most popular team sport in Australia. Literature on severe abdominal injuries in this sport is limited. The present study aims to review cases of renal trauma in Australian football at our institution.Met hods: A retrospective study was performed. All men admitted to our institution with renal trauma or haematuria associated with Australian football from July 1995 to July 2001 were analysed.Results: There were 13 cases of renal trauma; two were grade V injuries requiring nephrectomy.Conclusion: Renal injury will be intermittently encountered owing to the popularity of Australian football. Renal injuries are often difficult to assess and early recognition, management and referral to a district hospital is crucial.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)766-768
    JournalANZ Journal of Surgery
    Volume74
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Fingerprint

    Football
    Kidney
    Wounds and Injuries
    Sports
    Abdominal Injuries
    District Hospitals
    Hematuria
    Nephrectomy
    Referral and Consultation
    Retrospective Studies

    Cite this

    Lee, S. ; Thavaseelan, J. ; Low, Vincent. / Renal Trauma in Australian Rules Football: An Institutional Experience. In: ANZ Journal of Surgery. 2004 ; Vol. 74. pp. 766-768.
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    abstract = "Background: Australian rules football is the most popular team sport in Australia. Literature on severe abdominal injuries in this sport is limited. The present study aims to review cases of renal trauma in Australian football at our institution.Met hods: A retrospective study was performed. All men admitted to our institution with renal trauma or haematuria associated with Australian football from July 1995 to July 2001 were analysed.Results: There were 13 cases of renal trauma; two were grade V injuries requiring nephrectomy.Conclusion: Renal injury will be intermittently encountered owing to the popularity of Australian football. Renal injuries are often difficult to assess and early recognition, management and referral to a district hospital is crucial.",
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    Renal Trauma in Australian Rules Football: An Institutional Experience. / Lee, S.; Thavaseelan, J.; Low, Vincent.

    In: ANZ Journal of Surgery, Vol. 74, 2004, p. 766-768.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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    T1 - Renal Trauma in Australian Rules Football: An Institutional Experience

    AU - Lee, S.

    AU - Thavaseelan, J.

    AU - Low, Vincent

    PY - 2004

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    N2 - Background: Australian rules football is the most popular team sport in Australia. Literature on severe abdominal injuries in this sport is limited. The present study aims to review cases of renal trauma in Australian football at our institution.Met hods: A retrospective study was performed. All men admitted to our institution with renal trauma or haematuria associated with Australian football from July 1995 to July 2001 were analysed.Results: There were 13 cases of renal trauma; two were grade V injuries requiring nephrectomy.Conclusion: Renal injury will be intermittently encountered owing to the popularity of Australian football. Renal injuries are often difficult to assess and early recognition, management and referral to a district hospital is crucial.

    AB - Background: Australian rules football is the most popular team sport in Australia. Literature on severe abdominal injuries in this sport is limited. The present study aims to review cases of renal trauma in Australian football at our institution.Met hods: A retrospective study was performed. All men admitted to our institution with renal trauma or haematuria associated with Australian football from July 1995 to July 2001 were analysed.Results: There were 13 cases of renal trauma; two were grade V injuries requiring nephrectomy.Conclusion: Renal injury will be intermittently encountered owing to the popularity of Australian football. Renal injuries are often difficult to assess and early recognition, management and referral to a district hospital is crucial.

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    DO - 10.1111/j.1445-1433.2004.03137.x

    M3 - Review article

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    EP - 768

    JO - Australian New Zealand Journal of Surgery

    JF - Australian New Zealand Journal of Surgery

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