Remote regions and remote cameras: what sampling the last wild places can teach us about pelagic ecosystems

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Humans are altering marine assemblages at a global scale. Little is known about open ocean ecosystems and the anthropogenic impacts upon them relative to coastal ecosystems. Through a large-scale non-destructive survey, I demonstrate that distance from human populations provides a buffer to some of these impacts and that studying remote areas can offer insights into how these ecosystems function in a natural state. I provide information on the demographics, distribution, habitat associations, and behavioural interactions of pelagic species. This research informs management efforts by identifying areas as conservation priorities and providing benchmark data against which future change can be monitored.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Meeuwig, Jessica, Supervisor
  • Friedlander, Alan M., Supervisor, External person
  • Bouchet, Phil, Supervisor
  • Hemmi, Jan, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date4 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021

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