Relationships between psychosocial resilience and physical health status of Western Australian urban Aboriginal youth

K.D. Hopkins, Carrington Shepherd, Catherine Taylor, Stephen Zubrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Hopkins et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: Psychosocial processes are implicated as mediators of racial/ethnic health disparities via dysregulation of physiological responses to stress. Our aim was to investigate the extent to which factors previously documented as buffering the impact of high-risk family environments on Aboriginal youths' psychosocial functioning were similarly beneficial for their physical health status. Method and Results: We examined the relationship between psychosocial resilience and physical health of urban Aboriginal youth (12-17 years, n = 677) drawn from a representative survey of Western Australian Aboriginal children and their families. A composite variable of psychosocial resilient status, derived by cross-classifying youth by high/low family risk exposure and normal/abnormal psychosocial functioning, resulted in four groups-Resilient, Less Resilient, Expected Good and Vulnerable. Separate logistic regression modeling for high and low risk exposed youth revealed that Resilient youth were significantly more likely to have lower self-reported asthma symptoms (OR 3.48, p
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0145382
Pages (from-to)1-16
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Dec 2015

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