Regular exposure to non-burning ultraviolet radiation reduces signs of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in mature adult mice fed a high fat diet: Results of a pilot study

Samantha Teng, Lipi Chakravorty, Naomi Fleury, Shelley Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Obesity often emerges in middle age, increasing risk for metabolic disorders. Our previous preclinical experiments identified that chronic exposure to non-burning ultraviolet radiation, like that achieved through sun exposure, prevented weight gain and signs of metabolic dysfunction in young adult mice fed a high fat diet. Our objective was to perform a pilot study to estimate the effect size of ongoing exposure to sub-erythemal (non-burning, low dose) UVB (1 kJ/m 2 ) radiation on measures of adiposity, food intake and physical activity in 'mature' adult C57Bl/6J male mice fed a high fat diet for 12 weeks. Results: The severity of liver steatosis, fibrosis and inflammation were reduced in older adult mice exposed twice a week to ultraviolet radiation (from 29 weeks of age), compared to mock-irradiated mice, with some evidence for reduced hepatic mRNAs for tnf and tgfß1 (not fatp2 nor fasN). Power analyses suggested that up to 24 mice per treatment would be required in future experiments to detect a significant effect on some markers of adiposity such as body weight gain. Our studies suggest frequent exposure to low levels of sunlight may reduce the severity of hepatic steatosis induced in older adults living in environments of high caloric intake.

Original languageEnglish
Article number78
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2019

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