Reflexive, reciprocal and emphatic functions in Barunga Kriol

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

Abstract

This chapter describes the reflexive, reciprocal and adverbial emphatic markers mijelp, gija and miself in Barunga Kriol, the variety of the Australian Kriol spoken in Beswick/Wugularr (Top End, Northern Territory, Australia). These markers are interesting because their distribution has evolved in recent years, resulting in further and neater distinctions. Firstly, a typologically rare distinction between two types of reciprocals has emerged, where transitive verbs and " semi-transitive " verbs receive distinct reciprocal marking. This distinction could result from contact with other Kriol varieties, and represents an interesting pattern of contact-induced change, where no actual form or function is borrowed from the source language. Secondly, the reflexive and emphatic markers, which were originally quasi-identical, have evolved to become two (or more) well-differentiated items. Based on the analysis of these markers, this chapter examines the ways in which a creole can develop new categories, and questions the principles underlying these developments. Contact with neighbouring varieties of Kriol, as well as late substrate reinforcement, appear to have played a role in these innovations. In addition, this case study indicates that Kriol varieties can be influenced not only by their immediate substrates, but also by other Australian languages within a broader contact area, via contact between varieties.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLoss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation
EditorsFelicity Meakins, Carmel O'Shannessy
PublisherDe Gruyter Mouton
Pages297-332
Number of pages36
Volume13
ISBN (Electronic)9781501501036
ISBN (Print)9781614518877, 9781614518792
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameLanguage Contact and Bilingualism
Volume13

Fingerprint

Emphatics
Transitive Verb
Substrate
Reinforcement
Australian Languages
Innovation
Northern Territory
Source Language
Adverbials
Contact Induced Change

Cite this

Ponsonnet, M. (2016). Reflexive, reciprocal and emphatic functions in Barunga Kriol. In F. Meakins, & C. O'Shannessy (Eds.), Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation (Vol. 13, pp. 297-332). (Language Contact and Bilingualism; Vol. 13). De Gruyter Mouton.
Ponsonnet, Maïa. / Reflexive, reciprocal and emphatic functions in Barunga Kriol. Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation. editor / Felicity Meakins ; Carmel O'Shannessy. Vol. 13 De Gruyter Mouton, 2016. pp. 297-332 (Language Contact and Bilingualism).
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Ponsonnet, M 2016, Reflexive, reciprocal and emphatic functions in Barunga Kriol. in F Meakins & C O'Shannessy (eds), Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation. vol. 13, Language Contact and Bilingualism, vol. 13, De Gruyter Mouton, pp. 297-332.

Reflexive, reciprocal and emphatic functions in Barunga Kriol. / Ponsonnet, Maïa.

Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation. ed. / Felicity Meakins; Carmel O'Shannessy. Vol. 13 De Gruyter Mouton, 2016. p. 297-332 (Language Contact and Bilingualism; Vol. 13).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

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N2 - This chapter describes the reflexive, reciprocal and adverbial emphatic markers mijelp, gija and miself in Barunga Kriol, the variety of the Australian Kriol spoken in Beswick/Wugularr (Top End, Northern Territory, Australia). These markers are interesting because their distribution has evolved in recent years, resulting in further and neater distinctions. Firstly, a typologically rare distinction between two types of reciprocals has emerged, where transitive verbs and " semi-transitive " verbs receive distinct reciprocal marking. This distinction could result from contact with other Kriol varieties, and represents an interesting pattern of contact-induced change, where no actual form or function is borrowed from the source language. Secondly, the reflexive and emphatic markers, which were originally quasi-identical, have evolved to become two (or more) well-differentiated items. Based on the analysis of these markers, this chapter examines the ways in which a creole can develop new categories, and questions the principles underlying these developments. Contact with neighbouring varieties of Kriol, as well as late substrate reinforcement, appear to have played a role in these innovations. In addition, this case study indicates that Kriol varieties can be influenced not only by their immediate substrates, but also by other Australian languages within a broader contact area, via contact between varieties.

AB - This chapter describes the reflexive, reciprocal and adverbial emphatic markers mijelp, gija and miself in Barunga Kriol, the variety of the Australian Kriol spoken in Beswick/Wugularr (Top End, Northern Territory, Australia). These markers are interesting because their distribution has evolved in recent years, resulting in further and neater distinctions. Firstly, a typologically rare distinction between two types of reciprocals has emerged, where transitive verbs and " semi-transitive " verbs receive distinct reciprocal marking. This distinction could result from contact with other Kriol varieties, and represents an interesting pattern of contact-induced change, where no actual form or function is borrowed from the source language. Secondly, the reflexive and emphatic markers, which were originally quasi-identical, have evolved to become two (or more) well-differentiated items. Based on the analysis of these markers, this chapter examines the ways in which a creole can develop new categories, and questions the principles underlying these developments. Contact with neighbouring varieties of Kriol, as well as late substrate reinforcement, appear to have played a role in these innovations. In addition, this case study indicates that Kriol varieties can be influenced not only by their immediate substrates, but also by other Australian languages within a broader contact area, via contact between varieties.

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Ponsonnet M. Reflexive, reciprocal and emphatic functions in Barunga Kriol. In Meakins F, O'Shannessy C, editors, Loss and Renewal: Australian Languages Since Colonisation. Vol. 13. De Gruyter Mouton. 2016. p. 297-332. (Language Contact and Bilingualism).