Reducing distress in university students: A randomised control trial of two online interventions

Helen M. Stallman, Jeneva Ohan, Belinda Chiera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


Objective
University students experience high rates of distress and place increasing demands on provisions of support. Web‐based interventions may provide a low‐cost, accessible low intensity format to support students to make changes to improve their health and wellbeing.
Method
This study evaluated the efficacy of two web‐based interventions in the lead‐up to final exams: one on general mental health (thedesk) and one specifically focused on coping with distress (Care · Collaborate · Connect: Student Success). Because most students believe that stress is a normal part of the student experience (which might inhibit the effectiveness of support that is provided), we hypothesised that a program emphasising coping with stress would be more effective than a general program. Participants were 70 students with self‐reported elevated levels of psychological distress who were randomly assigned to one of the …
Original languageEnglish
JournalAustralian Psychologist
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2018

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