Reduced muscle necrosis and long-term benefits in dystrophic mdx mice after cVIq (blockade of TNF) treatment

H.G. Radley, Marilyn Davies, Miranda Grounds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that appears to exacerbate damage of dystrophic muscle in vivo. The monoclonal murine specific antibody cV1q that specifically neutralises murine TNF demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory effects in dystrophic mdx mice. cV1q administration protected dystrophic skeletal myofibres against necrosis in both young and adult mdx mice and in adult mdx mice subjected to 48 h voluntary wheel exercise. Long-term studies (up to 90 days) in voluntarily exercised mdx mice showed beneficial effects of cV1q treatment with reduced histological evidence of myofibre damage and a striking decrease in serum creatine kinase levels. However, in the absence of exercise long-term cV1q treatment did not reduce necrosis or background pathology in mdx mice. An additional measure of well-being in the cV1q treated mice was that they ran significantly more than control mdx mice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-238
JournalNeuromuscular Disorders
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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