Reduced immune responses in chimeric mice engrafted with bone marrow cells from mice with airways inflammation

N.M. Scott, R.L.X. Ng, T. A. McGonigle, Shelley Gorman, Prudence Hart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

© 2015, Springer Basel. Objective: During respiratory inflammation, it is generally assumed that dendritic cells differentiating from the bone marrow are immunogenic rather than immunoregulatory. Using chimeric mice, the outcomes of airways inflammation on bone marrow progenitor cells were studied. Methods: Immune responses were analyzed in chimeric mice engrafted for >16 weeks with bone marrow cells from mice with experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD). Results: Responses to sensitization and challenge with the allergen causing inflammation in the bone marrow-donor mice were significantly reduced in the chimeric mice engrafted with bone marrow cells from mice with EAAD (EAAD-chimeric). Responses to intranasal LPS and topical fluorescein isothiocyanate (non-specific challenges) were significantly attenuated. Fewer activated dendritic cells from the airways and skin of the EAAD-chimeric mice could be tracked to the draining lymph nodes, and may contribute to the significantly reduced antigen/chemical-induced hypertrophy in the draining nodes, and the reduced immune responses to sensitizing allergens. Dendritic cells differentiating in vitro from the bone marrow of >16 weeks reconstituted EAAD-chimeric mice retained an ability to poorly prime immune responses when transferred into naïve mice. Conclusions: Dendritic cells developing from bone marrow progenitors during airways inflammation are altered such that daughter cells have reduced antigen priming capabilities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)861-873
Number of pages13
JournalInflammation Research
Volume64
Issue number11
Early online date18 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015

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