Red cell distribution width correlates with fatigue levels in a diverse group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus irrespective of anaemia status

Chris Wincup, Chris Parnell, Sophie Cleanthous, Beatriz Tejera Segura, Matthew H Nguyen, Katherine Bryant, Sean G O'Neill, Toby Richards, Anisur Rahman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Fatigue remains a debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although in some cases this may be the result of intercurrent fibromyalgia, mood disorder or untreated metabolic syndrome, in many cases the cause is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and red cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of variability in erythrocyte size and volume.

METHODS: A total of 225 patients were recruited from three clinics in England and Australia. Patients completed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Fatigue Score or 12-item Short Form survey (SF-12) to measure fatigue, which was compared with RDW and haemoglobin. In a subgroup of 72 patients, markers of disease activity were also assessed for correlation with fatigue using univariate and multivariate analysis with fatigue as the dependent variable.

RESULTS: In all three groups, significant correlations between fatigue and RDW were observed (p<0.001; p=0.02; p<0.001 respectively) and this was preserved in multivariate analysis. There was no correlation between fatigue and haemoglobin in two groups (with the correlation between RDW and fatigue remaining significant in non-anaemic patients in the third group). In subgroup analysis, fatigue was not associated with any measures of disease activity.

CONCLUSIONS: We report a reproducible, statistically significant association between RDW and fatigue levels in a diverse population of patients with SLE. The findings of this study raise the possibility of a potential novel biological basis for fatigue in those in whom there is a lack of an alternate explanation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical and Experimental Rheumatology
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Erythrocyte Indices
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Fatigue
Anemia
Hemoglobins
Multivariate Analysis
Erythrocyte Volume
Fibromyalgia
Mood Disorders
England
Chronic Disease

Cite this

Wincup, Chris ; Parnell, Chris ; Cleanthous, Sophie ; Tejera Segura, Beatriz ; Nguyen, Matthew H ; Bryant, Katherine ; O'Neill, Sean G ; Richards, Toby ; Rahman, Anisur. / Red cell distribution width correlates with fatigue levels in a diverse group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus irrespective of anaemia status. In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology. 2019.
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title = "Red cell distribution width correlates with fatigue levels in a diverse group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus irrespective of anaemia status",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Fatigue remains a debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although in some cases this may be the result of intercurrent fibromyalgia, mood disorder or untreated metabolic syndrome, in many cases the cause is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and red cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of variability in erythrocyte size and volume.METHODS: A total of 225 patients were recruited from three clinics in England and Australia. Patients completed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Fatigue Score or 12-item Short Form survey (SF-12) to measure fatigue, which was compared with RDW and haemoglobin. In a subgroup of 72 patients, markers of disease activity were also assessed for correlation with fatigue using univariate and multivariate analysis with fatigue as the dependent variable.RESULTS: In all three groups, significant correlations between fatigue and RDW were observed (p<0.001; p=0.02; p<0.001 respectively) and this was preserved in multivariate analysis. There was no correlation between fatigue and haemoglobin in two groups (with the correlation between RDW and fatigue remaining significant in non-anaemic patients in the third group). In subgroup analysis, fatigue was not associated with any measures of disease activity.CONCLUSIONS: We report a reproducible, statistically significant association between RDW and fatigue levels in a diverse population of patients with SLE. The findings of this study raise the possibility of a potential novel biological basis for fatigue in those in whom there is a lack of an alternate explanation.",
author = "Chris Wincup and Chris Parnell and Sophie Cleanthous and {Tejera Segura}, Beatriz and Nguyen, {Matthew H} and Katherine Bryant and O'Neill, {Sean G} and Toby Richards and Anisur Rahman",
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Red cell distribution width correlates with fatigue levels in a diverse group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus irrespective of anaemia status. / Wincup, Chris; Parnell, Chris; Cleanthous, Sophie; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Nguyen, Matthew H; Bryant, Katherine; O'Neill, Sean G; Richards, Toby; Rahman, Anisur.

In: Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology, 28.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Red cell distribution width correlates with fatigue levels in a diverse group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus irrespective of anaemia status

AU - Wincup, Chris

AU - Parnell, Chris

AU - Cleanthous, Sophie

AU - Tejera Segura, Beatriz

AU - Nguyen, Matthew H

AU - Bryant, Katherine

AU - O'Neill, Sean G

AU - Richards, Toby

AU - Rahman, Anisur

PY - 2019/8/28

Y1 - 2019/8/28

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Fatigue remains a debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although in some cases this may be the result of intercurrent fibromyalgia, mood disorder or untreated metabolic syndrome, in many cases the cause is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and red cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of variability in erythrocyte size and volume.METHODS: A total of 225 patients were recruited from three clinics in England and Australia. Patients completed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Fatigue Score or 12-item Short Form survey (SF-12) to measure fatigue, which was compared with RDW and haemoglobin. In a subgroup of 72 patients, markers of disease activity were also assessed for correlation with fatigue using univariate and multivariate analysis with fatigue as the dependent variable.RESULTS: In all three groups, significant correlations between fatigue and RDW were observed (p<0.001; p=0.02; p<0.001 respectively) and this was preserved in multivariate analysis. There was no correlation between fatigue and haemoglobin in two groups (with the correlation between RDW and fatigue remaining significant in non-anaemic patients in the third group). In subgroup analysis, fatigue was not associated with any measures of disease activity.CONCLUSIONS: We report a reproducible, statistically significant association between RDW and fatigue levels in a diverse population of patients with SLE. The findings of this study raise the possibility of a potential novel biological basis for fatigue in those in whom there is a lack of an alternate explanation.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Fatigue remains a debilitating feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although in some cases this may be the result of intercurrent fibromyalgia, mood disorder or untreated metabolic syndrome, in many cases the cause is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and red cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of variability in erythrocyte size and volume.METHODS: A total of 225 patients were recruited from three clinics in England and Australia. Patients completed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Fatigue Score or 12-item Short Form survey (SF-12) to measure fatigue, which was compared with RDW and haemoglobin. In a subgroup of 72 patients, markers of disease activity were also assessed for correlation with fatigue using univariate and multivariate analysis with fatigue as the dependent variable.RESULTS: In all three groups, significant correlations between fatigue and RDW were observed (p<0.001; p=0.02; p<0.001 respectively) and this was preserved in multivariate analysis. There was no correlation between fatigue and haemoglobin in two groups (with the correlation between RDW and fatigue remaining significant in non-anaemic patients in the third group). In subgroup analysis, fatigue was not associated with any measures of disease activity.CONCLUSIONS: We report a reproducible, statistically significant association between RDW and fatigue levels in a diverse population of patients with SLE. The findings of this study raise the possibility of a potential novel biological basis for fatigue in those in whom there is a lack of an alternate explanation.

UR - https://www.clinexprheumatol.org/abstract.asp?a=13852

M3 - Article

JO - Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology

JF - Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology

SN - 0392-856X

ER -