Recent findings unravel genes and genetic factors underlying leptosphaeria maculans resistance in brassica napus and its relatives

Aldrin Y. Cantila, Nur Shuhadah Mohd Saad, Junrey C. Amas, David Edwards, Jacqueline Batley

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Among the Brassica oilseeds, canola (Brassica napus) is the most economically significant globally. However, its production can be limited by blackleg disease, caused by the fungal pathogen Lepstosphaeria maculans. The deployment of resistance genes has been implemented as one of the key strategies to manage the disease. Genetic resistance against blackleg comes in two forms: qualitative resistance, controlled by a single, major resistance gene (R gene), and quantitative resistance (QR), controlled by numerous, small effect loci. R-gene-mediated blackleg resistance has been extensively studied, wherein several genomic regions harbouring R genes against L. maculans have been identified and three of these genes were cloned. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanism of R gene and pathogen avirulence (Avr) gene interaction. Notably, these studies revealed a more complex interaction than originally thought. Advances in genomics help unravel these complexities, providing insights into the genes and genetic factors towards improving blackleg resistance. Here, we aim to discuss the existing R-gene-mediated resistance, make a summary of candidate R genes against the disease, and emphasise the role of players involved in the pathogenicity and resistance. The comprehensive result will allow breeders to improve resistance to L. maculans, thereby increasing yield.

Original languageEnglish
Article number313
Pages (from-to)1-25
Number of pages25
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume22
Issue number1
Early online date30 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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