Real-world implications of apathy among older adults: Independent associations with activities of daily living and quality of life

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Abstract

Objectives: Apathy is common in older adults and has been linked to adverse health outcomes. The current study examined whether apathy contributes to problems managing activities of daily living (ADLs) and lower quality of life (QoL) in older adults. Method: Participants included 83 community-dwelling older adults. Apathy was assessed using a composite of the self and family-rating scales from the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale (FrSBe). A knowledgeable informant completed the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ), and participants completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQol) scale. Results: Nominal logistic regressions controlling for age, anxiety and depression symptoms, chronic medical conditions, and global cognition revealed that higher levels of apathy were significantly associated with a wide range of mild ADL problems. In parallel, a multiple linear regression indicated that greater apathy was significantly associated with lower QoL independent of ADL problems, anxious and depressive symptomology, chronic medical conditions, global cognition and age. Discussion: Findings suggest that apathy confers an increased risk of problems in the independent management of daily activities and poorer well-being among community-dwelling older adults. Neurobehavioral and pharmacological interventions to improve apathy may have beneficial effects on the daily lives of older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)895-903
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Oct 2018

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Apathy
Activities of Daily Living
Quality of Life
Independent Living
Cognition
Linear Models
Anxiety
Logistic Models
Pharmacology
Depression
Health

Cite this

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title = "Real-world implications of apathy among older adults: Independent associations with activities of daily living and quality of life",
abstract = "Objectives: Apathy is common in older adults and has been linked to adverse health outcomes. The current study examined whether apathy contributes to problems managing activities of daily living (ADLs) and lower quality of life (QoL) in older adults. Method: Participants included 83 community-dwelling older adults. Apathy was assessed using a composite of the self and family-rating scales from the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale (FrSBe). A knowledgeable informant completed the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ), and participants completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQol) scale. Results: Nominal logistic regressions controlling for age, anxiety and depression symptoms, chronic medical conditions, and global cognition revealed that higher levels of apathy were significantly associated with a wide range of mild ADL problems. In parallel, a multiple linear regression indicated that greater apathy was significantly associated with lower QoL independent of ADL problems, anxious and depressive symptomology, chronic medical conditions, global cognition and age. Discussion: Findings suggest that apathy confers an increased risk of problems in the independent management of daily activities and poorer well-being among community-dwelling older adults. Neurobehavioral and pharmacological interventions to improve apathy may have beneficial effects on the daily lives of older adults.",
keywords = "Apathy, daily functioning, neuropsychology, successful aging, well-being",
author = "Tierney, {Savanna M.} and Woods, {Steven Paul} and Michael Weinborn and Bucks, {Romola S.}",
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N2 - Objectives: Apathy is common in older adults and has been linked to adverse health outcomes. The current study examined whether apathy contributes to problems managing activities of daily living (ADLs) and lower quality of life (QoL) in older adults. Method: Participants included 83 community-dwelling older adults. Apathy was assessed using a composite of the self and family-rating scales from the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale (FrSBe). A knowledgeable informant completed the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ), and participants completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQol) scale. Results: Nominal logistic regressions controlling for age, anxiety and depression symptoms, chronic medical conditions, and global cognition revealed that higher levels of apathy were significantly associated with a wide range of mild ADL problems. In parallel, a multiple linear regression indicated that greater apathy was significantly associated with lower QoL independent of ADL problems, anxious and depressive symptomology, chronic medical conditions, global cognition and age. Discussion: Findings suggest that apathy confers an increased risk of problems in the independent management of daily activities and poorer well-being among community-dwelling older adults. Neurobehavioral and pharmacological interventions to improve apathy may have beneficial effects on the daily lives of older adults.

AB - Objectives: Apathy is common in older adults and has been linked to adverse health outcomes. The current study examined whether apathy contributes to problems managing activities of daily living (ADLs) and lower quality of life (QoL) in older adults. Method: Participants included 83 community-dwelling older adults. Apathy was assessed using a composite of the self and family-rating scales from the Frontal Systems Behavioral Scale (FrSBe). A knowledgeable informant completed the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ), and participants completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQol) scale. Results: Nominal logistic regressions controlling for age, anxiety and depression symptoms, chronic medical conditions, and global cognition revealed that higher levels of apathy were significantly associated with a wide range of mild ADL problems. In parallel, a multiple linear regression indicated that greater apathy was significantly associated with lower QoL independent of ADL problems, anxious and depressive symptomology, chronic medical conditions, global cognition and age. Discussion: Findings suggest that apathy confers an increased risk of problems in the independent management of daily activities and poorer well-being among community-dwelling older adults. Neurobehavioral and pharmacological interventions to improve apathy may have beneficial effects on the daily lives of older adults.

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