Rapid Laboratory evolution of adult wing area in Drosophila Melanogaster in response to humidity

Jason Kennington, J.R. Killeen, D.B. Goldstein, L. Partridge

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35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the evolutionary response of wing area (a trait highly correlated with other measures of body size) to relative humidity (RH), temperature, and their interaction in Drosophila melanogaster, using replicated lines that had been allowed to evolve at low or high humidity at 18degreesC or at 25degreesC. We found that after 20 weeks of selection (5-10 generations), low RH lines had significantly greater wing areas than high RH lines in both sexes. This evolutionary response may have resulted from selection of larger flies with a smaller surface area for water loss relative to their weight, or as a correlated response to selection on some other unidentified trait. There were no evolutionary effects of temperature on wing area or cell density. This may have been due to the short duration of the selection experiment, and/or counteracting selection pressures on body size at warm temperature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)932-936
JournalEvolution
Volume57
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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