‘Rangeland Self Herding’ - positively influencing grazing distribution to benefit livestock, landscapes and people

Dean Revell, Bruce Maynard, Paul Erkelenz, Dean Thomas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

Positively influencing the grazing distribution of livestock will have benefits to productivity and landscape function. A behaviour-based approach, termed Rangelands Self Herding (RSH), is being tested and explored across locations in the Western Australian rangelands. RSH draws on a wealth of scientific research with seven guiding principles. Practical tools and tactics are being implemented
that are locally adapted to suit the environmental conditions and management goals of each situation. RSH is improving the way livestock use the landscape and interact with humans.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Australian Rangeland Society Conference
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventAustralian Rangeland Society 18th Biennial Conference - Alice Springs, Australia
Duration: 12 Apr 201516 Apr 2015
http://www.austrangesoc.com.au/data/2015conference/ARS_Handbook_2015_email.pdf

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Rangeland Society 18th Biennial Conference
CountryAustralia
CityAlice Springs
Period12/04/1516/04/15
Internet address

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    Revell, D., Maynard, B., Erkelenz, P., & Thomas, D. (2015). ‘Rangeland Self Herding’ - positively influencing grazing distribution to benefit livestock, landscapes and people. In Proceedings of the Australian Rangeland Society Conference