Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response

Hua Lin, Yajun Chen, Qinghai Song, Peili Fu, James Cleverly, Vincenzo Magliulo, Beverly E. Law, Christopher M. Gough, Lukas Hörtnagl, Filippo Di Gennaro, Giorgio Matteucci, Leonardo Montagnani, Pierpaolo Duce, Changliang Shao, Tomomichi Kato, Damien Bonal, Eugénie Paul-Limoges, Jason Beringer, John Grace, Zexin Fan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Deforestation and forest degradation cause the deterioration of resources and ecosystem services. However, there are still no operational indicators to measure forest status, especially for forest degradation. In the present study, we analysed the thermal response number (TRN, calculated by daily total net radiation divided by daily temperature range) of 163 sites including mature forest, disturbed forest, planted forest, shrubland, grassland, savanna vegetation and cropland. TRN generally increased with latitude, however the regression of TRN against latitude differed among vegetation types. Mature forests are superior as thermal buffers, and had significantly higher TRN than disturbed and planted forests. There was a clear boundary between TRN of forest and non-forest vegetation (i.e. grassland and savanna) with the exception of shrubland, whose TRN overlapped with that of forest vegetation. We propose to use the TRN of local mature forest as the optimal TRN (TRNopt). A forest with lower than 75% of TRNopt was identified as subjected to significant disturbance, and forests with 66% of TRNopt was the threshold for deforestation within the absolute latitude from 30° to 55°. Our results emphasized the irreplaceable thermal buffer capacity of mature forest. TRN can be used for early warning of deforestation and degradation risk. It is therefore a valuable tool in the effort to protect forests and prevent deforestation.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1286-1292
Number of pages7
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume607-608
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Dec 2017

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Deforestation
deforestation
Degradation
Buffers
Ecosystems
Deterioration
Radiation
Hot Temperature
shrubland
savanna
vegetation
grassland
Temperature
net radiation

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Lin, H., Chen, Y., Song, Q., Fu, P., Cleverly, J., Magliulo, V., ... Fan, Z. (2017). Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response. Science of the Total Environment, 607-608, 1286-1292. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.062
Lin, Hua ; Chen, Yajun ; Song, Qinghai ; Fu, Peili ; Cleverly, James ; Magliulo, Vincenzo ; Law, Beverly E. ; Gough, Christopher M. ; Hörtnagl, Lukas ; Di Gennaro, Filippo ; Matteucci, Giorgio ; Montagnani, Leonardo ; Duce, Pierpaolo ; Shao, Changliang ; Kato, Tomomichi ; Bonal, Damien ; Paul-Limoges, Eugénie ; Beringer, Jason ; Grace, John ; Fan, Zexin. / Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2017 ; Vol. 607-608. pp. 1286-1292
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abstract = "Deforestation and forest degradation cause the deterioration of resources and ecosystem services. However, there are still no operational indicators to measure forest status, especially for forest degradation. In the present study, we analysed the thermal response number (TRN, calculated by daily total net radiation divided by daily temperature range) of 163 sites including mature forest, disturbed forest, planted forest, shrubland, grassland, savanna vegetation and cropland. TRN generally increased with latitude, however the regression of TRN against latitude differed among vegetation types. Mature forests are superior as thermal buffers, and had significantly higher TRN than disturbed and planted forests. There was a clear boundary between TRN of forest and non-forest vegetation (i.e. grassland and savanna) with the exception of shrubland, whose TRN overlapped with that of forest vegetation. We propose to use the TRN of local mature forest as the optimal TRN (TRNopt). A forest with lower than 75{\%} of TRNopt was identified as subjected to significant disturbance, and forests with 66{\%} of TRNopt was the threshold for deforestation within the absolute latitude from 30° to 55°. Our results emphasized the irreplaceable thermal buffer capacity of mature forest. TRN can be used for early warning of deforestation and degradation risk. It is therefore a valuable tool in the effort to protect forests and prevent deforestation.",
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Lin, H, Chen, Y, Song, Q, Fu, P, Cleverly, J, Magliulo, V, Law, BE, Gough, CM, Hörtnagl, L, Di Gennaro, F, Matteucci, G, Montagnani, L, Duce, P, Shao, C, Kato, T, Bonal, D, Paul-Limoges, E, Beringer, J, Grace, J & Fan, Z 2017, 'Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response' Science of the Total Environment, vol 607-608, pp. 1286-1292. DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.062

Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response. / Lin, Hua; Chen, Yajun; Song, Qinghai; Fu, Peili; Cleverly, James; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Law, Beverly E.; Gough, Christopher M.; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Di Gennaro, Filippo; Matteucci, Giorgio; Montagnani, Leonardo; Duce, Pierpaolo; Shao, Changliang; Kato, Tomomichi; Bonal, Damien; Paul-Limoges, Eugénie; Beringer, Jason; Grace, John; Fan, Zexin.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 607-608, 31.12.2017, p. 1286-1292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response

AU - Lin,Hua

AU - Chen,Yajun

AU - Song,Qinghai

AU - Fu,Peili

AU - Cleverly,James

AU - Magliulo,Vincenzo

AU - Law,Beverly E.

AU - Gough,Christopher M.

AU - Hörtnagl,Lukas

AU - Di Gennaro,Filippo

AU - Matteucci,Giorgio

AU - Montagnani,Leonardo

AU - Duce,Pierpaolo

AU - Shao,Changliang

AU - Kato,Tomomichi

AU - Bonal,Damien

AU - Paul-Limoges,Eugénie

AU - Beringer,Jason

AU - Grace,John

AU - Fan,Zexin

PY - 2017/12/31

Y1 - 2017/12/31

N2 - Deforestation and forest degradation cause the deterioration of resources and ecosystem services. However, there are still no operational indicators to measure forest status, especially for forest degradation. In the present study, we analysed the thermal response number (TRN, calculated by daily total net radiation divided by daily temperature range) of 163 sites including mature forest, disturbed forest, planted forest, shrubland, grassland, savanna vegetation and cropland. TRN generally increased with latitude, however the regression of TRN against latitude differed among vegetation types. Mature forests are superior as thermal buffers, and had significantly higher TRN than disturbed and planted forests. There was a clear boundary between TRN of forest and non-forest vegetation (i.e. grassland and savanna) with the exception of shrubland, whose TRN overlapped with that of forest vegetation. We propose to use the TRN of local mature forest as the optimal TRN (TRNopt). A forest with lower than 75% of TRNopt was identified as subjected to significant disturbance, and forests with 66% of TRNopt was the threshold for deforestation within the absolute latitude from 30° to 55°. Our results emphasized the irreplaceable thermal buffer capacity of mature forest. TRN can be used for early warning of deforestation and degradation risk. It is therefore a valuable tool in the effort to protect forests and prevent deforestation.

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KW - Disturbance

KW - Reforestation

KW - Succession

KW - Surface temperature

KW - Temperature stability

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Lin H, Chen Y, Song Q, Fu P, Cleverly J, Magliulo V et al. Quantifying deforestation and forest degradation with thermal response. Science of the Total Environment. 2017 Dec 31;607-608:1286-1292. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.07.062