Quantification of walking-based physical activity and sedentary time in individuals with Rett syndrome

Jenny Downs, Helen Leonard, Kingsley Wong, Nikki Newton, Kylie Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To quantify, in individuals with Rett syndrome with the capacity to walk, walking-based activity and sedentary time, and to analyse the influences of age, walking ability, scoliosis, and the severity of epilepsy. Method: Sixty-four participants with a mean age of 17 years and 7 months (standard deviation [SD] 9y) were recruited from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database for this cross-sectional study. Each participant wore a StepWatch Activity Monitor for at least 4 days. Linear regression models were used to assess relationships between daily step count and the proportion of waking hours spent in sedentary time with the covariates of age group, walking ability, presence of scoliosis, and frequency of seizures. Results: On average, 62% (SD 19%) of waking hours were sedentary and 20% (SD 8%) was at cadences lower than or equal to 20 steps in a minute. The median daily steps count was 5093 (interquartile range 2026-8602). Compared with females younger than 13 years of age and accounting for the effects of covariates, adults took fewer steps, and both adolescents and adults had more sedentary time. Interpretation: Adolescents and adults led the least active lives and would appear to be in particular need of interventions aiming to optimize slow walking-based physical activity and reduce sedentary time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)605-611
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume59
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Rett Syndrome
Walking
Exercise
Scoliosis
Linear Models
Epilepsy
Seizures
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases

Cite this

@article{a128ff2a69e54de7b7a87a5b73df1533,
title = "Quantification of walking-based physical activity and sedentary time in individuals with Rett syndrome",
abstract = "Aim: To quantify, in individuals with Rett syndrome with the capacity to walk, walking-based activity and sedentary time, and to analyse the influences of age, walking ability, scoliosis, and the severity of epilepsy. Method: Sixty-four participants with a mean age of 17 years and 7 months (standard deviation [SD] 9y) were recruited from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database for this cross-sectional study. Each participant wore a StepWatch Activity Monitor for at least 4 days. Linear regression models were used to assess relationships between daily step count and the proportion of waking hours spent in sedentary time with the covariates of age group, walking ability, presence of scoliosis, and frequency of seizures. Results: On average, 62{\%} (SD 19{\%}) of waking hours were sedentary and 20{\%} (SD 8{\%}) was at cadences lower than or equal to 20 steps in a minute. The median daily steps count was 5093 (interquartile range 2026-8602). Compared with females younger than 13 years of age and accounting for the effects of covariates, adults took fewer steps, and both adolescents and adults had more sedentary time. Interpretation: Adolescents and adults led the least active lives and would appear to be in particular need of interventions aiming to optimize slow walking-based physical activity and reduce sedentary time.",
author = "Jenny Downs and Helen Leonard and Kingsley Wong and Nikki Newton and Kylie Hill",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1111/dmcn.13398",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "605--611",
journal = "Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology",
issn = "0012-1622",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Quantification of walking-based physical activity and sedentary time in individuals with Rett syndrome. / Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen; Wong, Kingsley; Newton, Nikki; Hill, Kylie.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 59, No. 6, 06.06.2017, p. 605-611.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantification of walking-based physical activity and sedentary time in individuals with Rett syndrome

AU - Downs, Jenny

AU - Leonard, Helen

AU - Wong, Kingsley

AU - Newton, Nikki

AU - Hill, Kylie

PY - 2017/6/6

Y1 - 2017/6/6

N2 - Aim: To quantify, in individuals with Rett syndrome with the capacity to walk, walking-based activity and sedentary time, and to analyse the influences of age, walking ability, scoliosis, and the severity of epilepsy. Method: Sixty-four participants with a mean age of 17 years and 7 months (standard deviation [SD] 9y) were recruited from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database for this cross-sectional study. Each participant wore a StepWatch Activity Monitor for at least 4 days. Linear regression models were used to assess relationships between daily step count and the proportion of waking hours spent in sedentary time with the covariates of age group, walking ability, presence of scoliosis, and frequency of seizures. Results: On average, 62% (SD 19%) of waking hours were sedentary and 20% (SD 8%) was at cadences lower than or equal to 20 steps in a minute. The median daily steps count was 5093 (interquartile range 2026-8602). Compared with females younger than 13 years of age and accounting for the effects of covariates, adults took fewer steps, and both adolescents and adults had more sedentary time. Interpretation: Adolescents and adults led the least active lives and would appear to be in particular need of interventions aiming to optimize slow walking-based physical activity and reduce sedentary time.

AB - Aim: To quantify, in individuals with Rett syndrome with the capacity to walk, walking-based activity and sedentary time, and to analyse the influences of age, walking ability, scoliosis, and the severity of epilepsy. Method: Sixty-four participants with a mean age of 17 years and 7 months (standard deviation [SD] 9y) were recruited from the Australian Rett Syndrome Database for this cross-sectional study. Each participant wore a StepWatch Activity Monitor for at least 4 days. Linear regression models were used to assess relationships between daily step count and the proportion of waking hours spent in sedentary time with the covariates of age group, walking ability, presence of scoliosis, and frequency of seizures. Results: On average, 62% (SD 19%) of waking hours were sedentary and 20% (SD 8%) was at cadences lower than or equal to 20 steps in a minute. The median daily steps count was 5093 (interquartile range 2026-8602). Compared with females younger than 13 years of age and accounting for the effects of covariates, adults took fewer steps, and both adolescents and adults had more sedentary time. Interpretation: Adolescents and adults led the least active lives and would appear to be in particular need of interventions aiming to optimize slow walking-based physical activity and reduce sedentary time.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85012921632&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dmcn.13398

DO - 10.1111/dmcn.13398

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 605

EP - 611

JO - Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology

JF - Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology

SN - 0012-1622

IS - 6

ER -