Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate

Cyril C. Grueter, Andrew M. Robbins, Didier Abavandimwe, Veronica Vecellio, Felix Ndagijimana, Tara S. Stoinski, Martha M. Robbins

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The effect of feeding competition on foraging efficiency is an important link between ecological factors and the social organization of gregarious species. We examined the effects of group size on daily travel distances, activity budgets, and energy intake of mountain gorillas in Rwanda. We measured daily travel distances of five groups, activity budgets of 79 gorillas in nine groups, and energy intake data for 23 adult females in three groups over a 16-month period. Travel distances and the proportion of time spent traveling increased with size for most groups, which would be expected if their foraging efficiency is limited by intragroup feeding competition. However, travel distances and times decreased for the largest group, which also had higher energy intake rates than intermediate sized groups. The improved foraging efficiency of the largest group may be explained by advantages in intergroup contest competition. The largest group had much lower home range overlap than the other study groups which may be due to groups avoiding one another as a result of male mating competition. Collectively, our results indicate that intermediate sized groups had the lowest foraging efficiency and provide a new twist on the growing evidence of non-linear relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in primates.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number16718
    JournalScientific Reports
    Volume8
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

    Fingerprint

    Energy Intake
    Gorilla gorilla
    Primates
    Budgets
    Homing Behavior
    Rwanda

    Cite this

    Grueter, C. C., Robbins, A. M., Abavandimwe, D., Vecellio, V., Ndagijimana, F., Stoinski, T. S., & Robbins, M. M. (2018). Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate. Scientific Reports, 8(1), [16718]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35255-0
    Grueter, Cyril C. ; Robbins, Andrew M. ; Abavandimwe, Didier ; Vecellio, Veronica ; Ndagijimana, Felix ; Stoinski, Tara S. ; Robbins, Martha M. / Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate. In: Scientific Reports. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 1.
    @article{4c50c9df6e4741078798a64b3727c29d,
    title = "Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate",
    abstract = "The effect of feeding competition on foraging efficiency is an important link between ecological factors and the social organization of gregarious species. We examined the effects of group size on daily travel distances, activity budgets, and energy intake of mountain gorillas in Rwanda. We measured daily travel distances of five groups, activity budgets of 79 gorillas in nine groups, and energy intake data for 23 adult females in three groups over a 16-month period. Travel distances and the proportion of time spent traveling increased with size for most groups, which would be expected if their foraging efficiency is limited by intragroup feeding competition. However, travel distances and times decreased for the largest group, which also had higher energy intake rates than intermediate sized groups. The improved foraging efficiency of the largest group may be explained by advantages in intergroup contest competition. The largest group had much lower home range overlap than the other study groups which may be due to groups avoiding one another as a result of male mating competition. Collectively, our results indicate that intermediate sized groups had the lowest foraging efficiency and provide a new twist on the growing evidence of non-linear relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in primates.",
    author = "Grueter, {Cyril C.} and Robbins, {Andrew M.} and Didier Abavandimwe and Veronica Vecellio and Felix Ndagijimana and Stoinski, {Tara S.} and Robbins, {Martha M.}",
    year = "2018",
    month = "12",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1038/s41598-018-35255-0",
    language = "English",
    volume = "8",
    journal = "Scientific Reports",
    issn = "2045-2322",
    publisher = "Nature Publishing Group - Macmillan Publishers",
    number = "1",

    }

    Grueter, CC, Robbins, AM, Abavandimwe, D, Vecellio, V, Ndagijimana, F, Stoinski, TS & Robbins, MM 2018, 'Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate' Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, 16718. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-35255-0

    Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate. / Grueter, Cyril C.; Robbins, Andrew M.; Abavandimwe, Didier; Vecellio, Veronica; Ndagijimana, Felix; Stoinski, Tara S.; Robbins, Martha M.

    In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 8, No. 1, 16718, 01.12.2018.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Quadratic relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in a herbivorous primate

    AU - Grueter, Cyril C.

    AU - Robbins, Andrew M.

    AU - Abavandimwe, Didier

    AU - Vecellio, Veronica

    AU - Ndagijimana, Felix

    AU - Stoinski, Tara S.

    AU - Robbins, Martha M.

    PY - 2018/12/1

    Y1 - 2018/12/1

    N2 - The effect of feeding competition on foraging efficiency is an important link between ecological factors and the social organization of gregarious species. We examined the effects of group size on daily travel distances, activity budgets, and energy intake of mountain gorillas in Rwanda. We measured daily travel distances of five groups, activity budgets of 79 gorillas in nine groups, and energy intake data for 23 adult females in three groups over a 16-month period. Travel distances and the proportion of time spent traveling increased with size for most groups, which would be expected if their foraging efficiency is limited by intragroup feeding competition. However, travel distances and times decreased for the largest group, which also had higher energy intake rates than intermediate sized groups. The improved foraging efficiency of the largest group may be explained by advantages in intergroup contest competition. The largest group had much lower home range overlap than the other study groups which may be due to groups avoiding one another as a result of male mating competition. Collectively, our results indicate that intermediate sized groups had the lowest foraging efficiency and provide a new twist on the growing evidence of non-linear relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in primates.

    AB - The effect of feeding competition on foraging efficiency is an important link between ecological factors and the social organization of gregarious species. We examined the effects of group size on daily travel distances, activity budgets, and energy intake of mountain gorillas in Rwanda. We measured daily travel distances of five groups, activity budgets of 79 gorillas in nine groups, and energy intake data for 23 adult females in three groups over a 16-month period. Travel distances and the proportion of time spent traveling increased with size for most groups, which would be expected if their foraging efficiency is limited by intragroup feeding competition. However, travel distances and times decreased for the largest group, which also had higher energy intake rates than intermediate sized groups. The improved foraging efficiency of the largest group may be explained by advantages in intergroup contest competition. The largest group had much lower home range overlap than the other study groups which may be due to groups avoiding one another as a result of male mating competition. Collectively, our results indicate that intermediate sized groups had the lowest foraging efficiency and provide a new twist on the growing evidence of non-linear relationships between group size and foraging efficiency in primates.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056478067&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1038/s41598-018-35255-0

    DO - 10.1038/s41598-018-35255-0

    M3 - Article

    VL - 8

    JO - Scientific Reports

    JF - Scientific Reports

    SN - 2045-2322

    IS - 1

    M1 - 16718

    ER -