Psychiatric symptoms post intensive care unit admission

Katherine Elizabeth Triplett, Andrew Ford, Matthew Anstey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 53-year-old woman was admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) with acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to severe community-acquired pneumonia that necessitated maximum supportive care with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Her medical history included bipolar disorder on quetiapine and sertraline, as well as a previous ICU admission, approximately 2 years prior, for non-cirrhotic hyperammonaemic encephalopathy that was complicated by prolonged post discharge anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder-like symptoms, consistent with post-intensive-care syndrome. Here, we present a case, and explore the outcomes for a patient who had two separate admissions with life-threatening illnesses, but had distinct differences in the psychological outcomes following each illness.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere231917
JournalBMJ Case Reports
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Dec 2019

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Intensive Care Units
Psychiatry
Sertraline
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Brain Diseases
Tertiary Healthcare
Critical Care
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Pneumonia
Anxiety
Psychology
Quetiapine Fumarate

Cite this

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Psychiatric symptoms post intensive care unit admission. / Triplett, Katherine Elizabeth; Ford, Andrew; Anstey, Matthew.

In: BMJ Case Reports, Vol. 12, No. 12, e231917, 29.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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