Prolonged uninterrupted sitting elevates postprandial hyperglycaemia proportional to degree of insulin resistance

Paddy C. Dempsey, Robyn N. Larsen, Elisabeth A.H. Winkler, Neville Owen, Bronwyn A. Kingwell, David W. Dunstan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prolonged uninterrupted sitting is related adversely to cardiometabolic risk markers and postprandial hyperglycaemia, relative to sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks. However, whether the magnitude of hyperglycaemic responses to prolonged sitting is dependent upon the underlying degree of insulin resistance remains unclear. Data were pooled from 3 randomized cross-over laboratory-based trials (n = 62) that examined the postprandial blood glucose- and insulin-lowering effects of prolonged sitting vs sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks in overweight/obese adults who had normal or impaired glucose metabolism (2 trials) or type 2 diabetes not treated by insulin (1 trial). Corrected for study effects, the magnitude of differences in postprandial glucose and insulin responses between the 2 conditions was significantly exacerbated with poorer baseline levels of fasting glucose, insulin and/or surrogate markers of β-cell function and insulin resistance. This suggests that those with higher underlying levels of insulin resistance may derive greater metabolic benefits from regularly interrupting prolonged sitting than their healthier counterparts. If these findings can be replicated, they may have implications for future targeting and optimization of physical activity/sedentary behaviour interventions in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1526-1530
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Hyperglycemia
Insulin Resistance
Insulin
Glucose
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Blood Glucose
Fasting
Biomarkers
Exercise

Cite this

Dempsey, Paddy C. ; Larsen, Robyn N. ; Winkler, Elisabeth A.H. ; Owen, Neville ; Kingwell, Bronwyn A. ; Dunstan, David W. / Prolonged uninterrupted sitting elevates postprandial hyperglycaemia proportional to degree of insulin resistance. In: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. 2018 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 1526-1530.
@article{43ede88f476045a59712175156ff0cd6,
title = "Prolonged uninterrupted sitting elevates postprandial hyperglycaemia proportional to degree of insulin resistance",
abstract = "Prolonged uninterrupted sitting is related adversely to cardiometabolic risk markers and postprandial hyperglycaemia, relative to sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks. However, whether the magnitude of hyperglycaemic responses to prolonged sitting is dependent upon the underlying degree of insulin resistance remains unclear. Data were pooled from 3 randomized cross-over laboratory-based trials (n = 62) that examined the postprandial blood glucose- and insulin-lowering effects of prolonged sitting vs sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks in overweight/obese adults who had normal or impaired glucose metabolism (2 trials) or type 2 diabetes not treated by insulin (1 trial). Corrected for study effects, the magnitude of differences in postprandial glucose and insulin responses between the 2 conditions was significantly exacerbated with poorer baseline levels of fasting glucose, insulin and/or surrogate markers of β-cell function and insulin resistance. This suggests that those with higher underlying levels of insulin resistance may derive greater metabolic benefits from regularly interrupting prolonged sitting than their healthier counterparts. If these findings can be replicated, they may have implications for future targeting and optimization of physical activity/sedentary behaviour interventions in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.",
keywords = "diabetes, exercise, glycaemic control, insulin resistance, sedentary behaviour, sitting",
author = "Dempsey, {Paddy C.} and Larsen, {Robyn N.} and Winkler, {Elisabeth A.H.} and Neville Owen and Kingwell, {Bronwyn A.} and Dunstan, {David W.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/dom.13254",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "1526--1530",
journal = "Diabets, Obesity and Metabolism",
issn = "1462-8902",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Prolonged uninterrupted sitting elevates postprandial hyperglycaemia proportional to degree of insulin resistance. / Dempsey, Paddy C.; Larsen, Robyn N.; Winkler, Elisabeth A.H.; Owen, Neville; Kingwell, Bronwyn A.; Dunstan, David W.

In: Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 1526-1530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prolonged uninterrupted sitting elevates postprandial hyperglycaemia proportional to degree of insulin resistance

AU - Dempsey, Paddy C.

AU - Larsen, Robyn N.

AU - Winkler, Elisabeth A.H.

AU - Owen, Neville

AU - Kingwell, Bronwyn A.

AU - Dunstan, David W.

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Prolonged uninterrupted sitting is related adversely to cardiometabolic risk markers and postprandial hyperglycaemia, relative to sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks. However, whether the magnitude of hyperglycaemic responses to prolonged sitting is dependent upon the underlying degree of insulin resistance remains unclear. Data were pooled from 3 randomized cross-over laboratory-based trials (n = 62) that examined the postprandial blood glucose- and insulin-lowering effects of prolonged sitting vs sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks in overweight/obese adults who had normal or impaired glucose metabolism (2 trials) or type 2 diabetes not treated by insulin (1 trial). Corrected for study effects, the magnitude of differences in postprandial glucose and insulin responses between the 2 conditions was significantly exacerbated with poorer baseline levels of fasting glucose, insulin and/or surrogate markers of β-cell function and insulin resistance. This suggests that those with higher underlying levels of insulin resistance may derive greater metabolic benefits from regularly interrupting prolonged sitting than their healthier counterparts. If these findings can be replicated, they may have implications for future targeting and optimization of physical activity/sedentary behaviour interventions in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.

AB - Prolonged uninterrupted sitting is related adversely to cardiometabolic risk markers and postprandial hyperglycaemia, relative to sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks. However, whether the magnitude of hyperglycaemic responses to prolonged sitting is dependent upon the underlying degree of insulin resistance remains unclear. Data were pooled from 3 randomized cross-over laboratory-based trials (n = 62) that examined the postprandial blood glucose- and insulin-lowering effects of prolonged sitting vs sitting interrupted by regular brief activity breaks in overweight/obese adults who had normal or impaired glucose metabolism (2 trials) or type 2 diabetes not treated by insulin (1 trial). Corrected for study effects, the magnitude of differences in postprandial glucose and insulin responses between the 2 conditions was significantly exacerbated with poorer baseline levels of fasting glucose, insulin and/or surrogate markers of β-cell function and insulin resistance. This suggests that those with higher underlying levels of insulin resistance may derive greater metabolic benefits from regularly interrupting prolonged sitting than their healthier counterparts. If these findings can be replicated, they may have implications for future targeting and optimization of physical activity/sedentary behaviour interventions in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes.

KW - diabetes

KW - exercise

KW - glycaemic control

KW - insulin resistance

KW - sedentary behaviour

KW - sitting

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85043309538&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dom.13254

DO - 10.1111/dom.13254

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 1526

EP - 1530

JO - Diabets, Obesity and Metabolism

JF - Diabets, Obesity and Metabolism

SN - 1462-8902

IS - 6

ER -