Progress monitoring and feedback delivered in routine psychiatric care: Beneficial but not reaching those thought to need it most

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Abstract

Objective: The study evaluated the use and effectiveness of a progress monitoring system routinely operational in a private mental health care setting. Method: In a nonrandomized trial in which 778 consecutively admitted patients underwent a 2-week cognitive behavioral therapy intervention, the effectiveness of therapists choosing to use progress monitoring feedback to frame therapist–patient discussions about individuals’ progress was evaluated. Results: Patients engaged in discussions involving progress monitoring feedback during the intervention achieved a more consistent recovery rate. Furthermore, individuals that were not-on-track to achieve a positive outcome experienced a boost to recovery immediately after receiving feedback. However, evidence suggested that therapists were not using progress monitoring to primarily focus additional resources on not-on-track patients. Conclusion: Progress monitoring feedback benefited patient recovery. However, guidelines could improve the system by directing therapists to use feedback primarily with patients not on course for a positive therapeutic outcome.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychotherapy Research
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jan 2020

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