Profile of self-reported problems with executive functioning in college and professional football players

Daniel R Seichepine, Julie M Stamm, Daniel H Daneshvar, David O Riley, Christine M Baugh, Brandon E Gavett, Yorghos Tripodis, Brett Martin, Christine Chaisson, Ann C McKee, Robert C Cantu, Christopher J Nowinski, Robert A Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), such as that experienced by contact-sport athletes, has been associated with the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Executive dysfunction is believed to be among the earliest symptoms of CTE, with these symptoms presenting in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The present study used a well-validated self-report measure to study executive functioning in football players, compared to healthy adults. Sixty-four college and professional football players were administered the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, adult version (BRIEF-A) to evaluate nine areas of executive functioning. Scores on the BRIEF-A were compared to published age-corrected normative scores for healthy adults Relative to healthy adults, the football players indicated significantly more problems overall and on seven of the nine clinical scales, including Inhibit, Shift, Emotional Control, Initiate, Working Memory, Plan/Organize, and Task Monitor. These symptoms were greater in athletes 40 and older, relative to younger players. In sum, football players reported more-frequent problems with executive functioning and these symptoms may develop or worsen in the fifth decade of life. The findings are in accord with a growing body of evidence that participation in football is associated with the development of cognitive changes and dementia as observed in CTE.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1299-304
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume30
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2013
Externally publishedYes

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