Processing full-scale square kilometre array data on the summit supercomputer

Ruonan Wang, Rodrigo Tobar, Markus Dolensky, Tao An, Andreas Wicenec, Chen Wu, Fred Dulwich, Norbert Podhorszki, Valentine Anantharaj, Eric Suchyta, Baoqiang Lao, Scott Klasky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

This work presents a workflow for simulating and processing the full-scale low-frequency telescope data of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Phase 1. The SKA project will enter the construction phase soon, and once completed, it will be the world's largest radio telescope and one of the world's largest data generators. The authors used Summit to mimic an endto-end SKA workflow, simulating a dataset of a typical 6 hour observation and then processing that dataset with an imaging pipeline. This workflow was deployed and run on 4,560 compute nodes, and used 27,360 GPUs to generate 2.6 PB of data. This was the first time that radio astronomical data were processed at this scale. Results show that the workflow has the capability to process one of the key SKA science cases, an Epoch of Reionization observation. This analysis also helps reveal critical design factors for the next-generation radio telescopes and the required dedicated processing facilities.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSC20: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Volume2020
ISBN (Electronic)9781728199986
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2020
Event2020 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, SC 2020 - Virtual, Atlanta, United States
Duration: 9 Nov 202019 Nov 2020

Conference

Conference2020 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis, SC 2020
CountryUnited States
CityVirtual, Atlanta
Period9/11/2019/11/20

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