Problem-based-learning effectively teaches patient-centred interprofessional care to medical, nursing and allied health students

Denese Playford, I. Hagues

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Background. Interprofessional work characterises contemporary medical practice, and teaching interprofessional practice is a developing educational priority in which best practice is not yet established. Method. The authors developed an interprofessional case for medical, nursing and allied health students on routine clinical placements in rural Australia. Students spent an intensive week following an Indigenous case of stroke. Using problem-based-learning methodology to identify and research learning issues, students were encouraged to place the patient at the centre of discussion, to identify and value discipline-specific skills, and to grasp holistic shared care. Results. In this context, understanding of the benefit of interprofessional teams developed rapidly and to a sophisticated level. Since the teaching took place as part of routine clinical placement, it did not add to curriculum hours, student learning outcomes or assessment load. Conclusions. The authors conclude the PBL approach involving multiple disciplines is a cost-effective way to prepare pre-graduates for interprofessional practice. [Author abstract]Notes: Refereed article. Includes bibliographical references.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)51-55
    JournalFocus on health professional education : a multi-disciplinary journal
    Volume10
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

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