Probiotics for treatment and primary prevention of allergic diseases and asthma: looking back and moving forward

C.E. E. West, M.C. C. Jenmalm, A.L. L. Kozyrskyj, Susan L. Prescott

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Microbial ecosystems cover the surface of the human body and it is becoming increasingly clear that our modern environment has profound effects on microbial composition and diversity. A dysbiotic gut microbiota has been associated with allergic diseases and asthma in cross-sectional and observational studies. In an attempt to restore this dysbiosis, probiotics have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. Here, we review treatment and primary prevention studies, recent meta-analyses, and discuss the current understanding of the role of probiotics in this context. Many meta-analyses have shown a moderate benefit of probiotics for eczema prevention, whereas there is less evidence of a benefit for other allergic manifestations. Because of very low quality evidence and heterogeneity between studies, specific advice on the most effective regimens cannot yet be given – not even for eczema prevention. To be able to adopt results into specific recommendations, international expert organizations stress the need for well-designed studies. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)625-639
    Number of pages15
    JournalExpert Review of Clinical Immunology
    Volume12
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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