Primary pollinator exclusion has divergent consequences for pollen dispersal and mating in different populations of a bird-pollinated tree

Nicole Bezemer, Stephen D. Hopper, Siegy L. Krauss, Ryan D. Phillips, David G. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Pollination by nectarivorous birds is predicted to result in different patterns of pollen dispersal and plant mating compared to pollination by insects. We tested the prediction that paternal genetic diversity, outcrossing rate and realized pollen dispersal will be reduced when the primary pollinator group is excluded from bird-pollinated plants. Pollinator exclusion experiments in conjunction with paternity analysis of progeny were applied to Eucalyptus caesia Benth. (Myrtaceae), a predominantly honeyeater-pollinated tree that is visited by native insects and the introduced Apis mellifera (Apidae). Microsatellite genotyping at 14 loci of all adult E. caesia at two populations (n = 580 and 315), followed by paternity analysis of 705 progeny, revealed contrasting results between populations. Honeyeater exclusion did not significantly impact pollen dispersal or plant mating at Mount Caroline. In contrast, at the Chiddarcooping site, the exclusion of honeyeaters led to lower outcrossing rates, a threefold reduction in the average number of sires per fruit, a decrease in intermediate-distance mating and an increase in near-neighbour mating. The results from Chiddarcooping suggest that bird pollination may increase paternal genetic diversity, potentially leading to higher fitness of progeny and favouring the evolution of this strategy. However, further experimentation involving additional trees and study sites is required to test this hypothesis. Alternatively, insects may be effective pollinators in some populations of bird-adapted plants, but ineffective in others.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMolecular Ecology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

pollen flow
pollinating insects
Pollen
pollinator
Pollination
Birds
pollen
pollination
Plant Dispersal
bird
Insects
outcrossing
Bees
birds
paternity
insect
Population
Myrtaceae
exclusion experiment
insect pollination

Cite this

@article{1a0be97354c148f59856a317a41b6099,
title = "Primary pollinator exclusion has divergent consequences for pollen dispersal and mating in different populations of a bird-pollinated tree",
abstract = "Pollination by nectarivorous birds is predicted to result in different patterns of pollen dispersal and plant mating compared to pollination by insects. We tested the prediction that paternal genetic diversity, outcrossing rate and realized pollen dispersal will be reduced when the primary pollinator group is excluded from bird-pollinated plants. Pollinator exclusion experiments in conjunction with paternity analysis of progeny were applied to Eucalyptus caesia Benth. (Myrtaceae), a predominantly honeyeater-pollinated tree that is visited by native insects and the introduced Apis mellifera (Apidae). Microsatellite genotyping at 14 loci of all adult E. caesia at two populations (n = 580 and 315), followed by paternity analysis of 705 progeny, revealed contrasting results between populations. Honeyeater exclusion did not significantly impact pollen dispersal or plant mating at Mount Caroline. In contrast, at the Chiddarcooping site, the exclusion of honeyeaters led to lower outcrossing rates, a threefold reduction in the average number of sires per fruit, a decrease in intermediate-distance mating and an increase in near-neighbour mating. The results from Chiddarcooping suggest that bird pollination may increase paternal genetic diversity, potentially leading to higher fitness of progeny and favouring the evolution of this strategy. However, further experimentation involving additional trees and study sites is required to test this hypothesis. Alternatively, insects may be effective pollinators in some populations of bird-adapted plants, but ineffective in others.",
keywords = "bird pollination, honeyeater, multiple paternity, paternity analysis, pollen dispersal, pollinator exclusion",
author = "Nicole Bezemer and Hopper, {Stephen D.} and Krauss, {Siegy L.} and Phillips, {Ryan D.} and Roberts, {David G.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1111/mec.15264",
language = "English",
journal = "Molecular Ecology",
issn = "0962-1083",
publisher = "Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Primary pollinator exclusion has divergent consequences for pollen dispersal and mating in different populations of a bird-pollinated tree

AU - Bezemer, Nicole

AU - Hopper, Stephen D.

AU - Krauss, Siegy L.

AU - Phillips, Ryan D.

AU - Roberts, David G.

PY - 2019/10/9

Y1 - 2019/10/9

N2 - Pollination by nectarivorous birds is predicted to result in different patterns of pollen dispersal and plant mating compared to pollination by insects. We tested the prediction that paternal genetic diversity, outcrossing rate and realized pollen dispersal will be reduced when the primary pollinator group is excluded from bird-pollinated plants. Pollinator exclusion experiments in conjunction with paternity analysis of progeny were applied to Eucalyptus caesia Benth. (Myrtaceae), a predominantly honeyeater-pollinated tree that is visited by native insects and the introduced Apis mellifera (Apidae). Microsatellite genotyping at 14 loci of all adult E. caesia at two populations (n = 580 and 315), followed by paternity analysis of 705 progeny, revealed contrasting results between populations. Honeyeater exclusion did not significantly impact pollen dispersal or plant mating at Mount Caroline. In contrast, at the Chiddarcooping site, the exclusion of honeyeaters led to lower outcrossing rates, a threefold reduction in the average number of sires per fruit, a decrease in intermediate-distance mating and an increase in near-neighbour mating. The results from Chiddarcooping suggest that bird pollination may increase paternal genetic diversity, potentially leading to higher fitness of progeny and favouring the evolution of this strategy. However, further experimentation involving additional trees and study sites is required to test this hypothesis. Alternatively, insects may be effective pollinators in some populations of bird-adapted plants, but ineffective in others.

AB - Pollination by nectarivorous birds is predicted to result in different patterns of pollen dispersal and plant mating compared to pollination by insects. We tested the prediction that paternal genetic diversity, outcrossing rate and realized pollen dispersal will be reduced when the primary pollinator group is excluded from bird-pollinated plants. Pollinator exclusion experiments in conjunction with paternity analysis of progeny were applied to Eucalyptus caesia Benth. (Myrtaceae), a predominantly honeyeater-pollinated tree that is visited by native insects and the introduced Apis mellifera (Apidae). Microsatellite genotyping at 14 loci of all adult E. caesia at two populations (n = 580 and 315), followed by paternity analysis of 705 progeny, revealed contrasting results between populations. Honeyeater exclusion did not significantly impact pollen dispersal or plant mating at Mount Caroline. In contrast, at the Chiddarcooping site, the exclusion of honeyeaters led to lower outcrossing rates, a threefold reduction in the average number of sires per fruit, a decrease in intermediate-distance mating and an increase in near-neighbour mating. The results from Chiddarcooping suggest that bird pollination may increase paternal genetic diversity, potentially leading to higher fitness of progeny and favouring the evolution of this strategy. However, further experimentation involving additional trees and study sites is required to test this hypothesis. Alternatively, insects may be effective pollinators in some populations of bird-adapted plants, but ineffective in others.

KW - bird pollination

KW - honeyeater

KW - multiple paternity

KW - paternity analysis

KW - pollen dispersal

KW - pollinator exclusion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074584168&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/mec.15264

DO - 10.1111/mec.15264

M3 - Article

JO - Molecular Ecology

JF - Molecular Ecology

SN - 0962-1083

ER -