Primary infection with zidovudine-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 does not adversely affect outcome at 1 year. Sydney Primary HIV Infection Study Group

A Imrie, A Carr, C Duncombe, R Finlayson, J Vizzard, M Law, J Kaldor, R Penny, D A Cooper

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34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants with reduced in vitro sensitivity to zidovudine, conferred by specific mutations in the viral reverse transcriptase, emerge during prolonged therapy. Late-stage disease and declining CD4 cell count are associated with more rapid emergence of these resistant variants. Isolates of HIV-1 from seroconverters were screened for the zidovudine-resistance marker mutation at codon 215. HIV-1 with the altered genotype was detected in 5 (8.2%) of 61 patients soon after onset of symptomatic primary illness and from the sex partner of 1 patient. These transmitted resistant viruses were either replaced by strains susceptible to zidovudine within a few months of infection or persisted for up to 1 year in the absence of prolonged zidovudine therapy. The resistant genotype persisted in 3 of 5 seroconverters but in 2 patients had reverted to wild type at 48 and 52 weeks. Primary infection with zidovudine-resistant variants of HIV-1 was not associated with a more severe symptomatic primary illness or more rapid CD4 cell decline at 1 year after infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)195-8
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of infectious diseases
Volume174
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1996

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