Prevention of coronary heart disease with aspirin and clopidogrel: efficacy, safety, costs and cost-effectiveness

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Abstract

Atherothrombotic coronary artery disease is the single most common cause of death worldwide and a growing public health problem. Platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and are therefore commonly targeted by one or more antiplatelet drugs as part of primary and secondary atherothrombosis prevention strategies. Aspirin reduces the risk of serious vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) by approximately 20% in a broad range of high-risk patients and remains the first-line antiplatelet drug because of its relative safety, low cost and cost-effectiveness. Compared with aspirin alone, clopidogrel reduces the risk of serious vascular events by approximately 10% and the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel reduces the risk by approximately 20% in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Clopidogrel has a similar safety profile to aspirin but clopidogrel tablets are substantially more expensive. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of clopidogrel compared with aspirin is favourable, particularly in high-risk patients and is intermediate compared with a range of other effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of coronary heart disease. Clopidogrel should be considered as a replacement for aspirin in patients who are allergic to aspirin, cannot tolerate aspirin, have experienced a recurrent atherothrombotic vascular event whilst taking aspirin and are at very high absolute risk of a serious vascular event (e.g., > 20%/year). The combination of clopidogrel and aspirin should be considered in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)493-503
Number of pages11
JournalExpert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2004

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clopidogrel
Aspirin
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Coronary Disease
Safety
Costs and Cost Analysis
Blood Vessels
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Acute Coronary Syndrome
Myocardial Infarction

Cite this

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title = "Prevention of coronary heart disease with aspirin and clopidogrel: efficacy, safety, costs and cost-effectiveness",
abstract = "Atherothrombotic coronary artery disease is the single most common cause of death worldwide and a growing public health problem. Platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and are therefore commonly targeted by one or more antiplatelet drugs as part of primary and secondary atherothrombosis prevention strategies. Aspirin reduces the risk of serious vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) by approximately 20{\%} in a broad range of high-risk patients and remains the first-line antiplatelet drug because of its relative safety, low cost and cost-effectiveness. Compared with aspirin alone, clopidogrel reduces the risk of serious vascular events by approximately 10{\%} and the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel reduces the risk by approximately 20{\%} in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Clopidogrel has a similar safety profile to aspirin but clopidogrel tablets are substantially more expensive. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of clopidogrel compared with aspirin is favourable, particularly in high-risk patients and is intermediate compared with a range of other effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of coronary heart disease. Clopidogrel should be considered as a replacement for aspirin in patients who are allergic to aspirin, cannot tolerate aspirin, have experienced a recurrent atherothrombotic vascular event whilst taking aspirin and are at very high absolute risk of a serious vascular event (e.g., > 20{\%}/year). The combination of clopidogrel and aspirin should be considered in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.",
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author = "Ho, {Wai Khoon} and Hankey, {Graeme J} and Eikelboom, {John W}",
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T1 - Prevention of coronary heart disease with aspirin and clopidogrel

T2 - efficacy, safety, costs and cost-effectiveness

AU - Ho, Wai Khoon

AU - Hankey, Graeme J

AU - Eikelboom, John W

PY - 2004/3

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N2 - Atherothrombotic coronary artery disease is the single most common cause of death worldwide and a growing public health problem. Platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and are therefore commonly targeted by one or more antiplatelet drugs as part of primary and secondary atherothrombosis prevention strategies. Aspirin reduces the risk of serious vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) by approximately 20% in a broad range of high-risk patients and remains the first-line antiplatelet drug because of its relative safety, low cost and cost-effectiveness. Compared with aspirin alone, clopidogrel reduces the risk of serious vascular events by approximately 10% and the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel reduces the risk by approximately 20% in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Clopidogrel has a similar safety profile to aspirin but clopidogrel tablets are substantially more expensive. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of clopidogrel compared with aspirin is favourable, particularly in high-risk patients and is intermediate compared with a range of other effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of coronary heart disease. Clopidogrel should be considered as a replacement for aspirin in patients who are allergic to aspirin, cannot tolerate aspirin, have experienced a recurrent atherothrombotic vascular event whilst taking aspirin and are at very high absolute risk of a serious vascular event (e.g., > 20%/year). The combination of clopidogrel and aspirin should be considered in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

AB - Atherothrombotic coronary artery disease is the single most common cause of death worldwide and a growing public health problem. Platelets play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and are therefore commonly targeted by one or more antiplatelet drugs as part of primary and secondary atherothrombosis prevention strategies. Aspirin reduces the risk of serious vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death) by approximately 20% in a broad range of high-risk patients and remains the first-line antiplatelet drug because of its relative safety, low cost and cost-effectiveness. Compared with aspirin alone, clopidogrel reduces the risk of serious vascular events by approximately 10% and the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel reduces the risk by approximately 20% in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Clopidogrel has a similar safety profile to aspirin but clopidogrel tablets are substantially more expensive. However, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of clopidogrel compared with aspirin is favourable, particularly in high-risk patients and is intermediate compared with a range of other effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of coronary heart disease. Clopidogrel should be considered as a replacement for aspirin in patients who are allergic to aspirin, cannot tolerate aspirin, have experienced a recurrent atherothrombotic vascular event whilst taking aspirin and are at very high absolute risk of a serious vascular event (e.g., > 20%/year). The combination of clopidogrel and aspirin should be considered in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

KW - Aspirin/adverse effects

KW - Clinical Trials as Topic

KW - Coronary Disease/diagnosis

KW - Cost-Benefit Analysis

KW - Drug Therapy, Combination

KW - Humans

KW - Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/adverse effects

KW - Ticlopidine/analogs & derivatives

KW - Treatment Outcome

U2 - 10.1517/14656566.5.3.493

DO - 10.1517/14656566.5.3.493

M3 - Review article

VL - 5

SP - 493

EP - 503

JO - Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy

JF - Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy

SN - 1465-6566

IS - 3

ER -