Prevention and management of injury in competitive swimming

Julie Hardt

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    384 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    [Truncated abstract] Three studies were conducted to examine current coach‐implemented injury prevention and management practices in high‐performance competitive swimming. Coach and swimmer perceptions of the use of and importance of coachimplemented injury prevention and management behaviours were also investigated. Study One employed one‐on‐one semi‐structured interviews to survey perceptions of elite coaches (N=12), injured swimmers (N=5), and sports medicine professionals (N=6) from the United States and Australia on what coaches should do to prevent and manage injuries. Participant responses reflected a four‐phase cycle of injury prevention and management, starting from Injury Prevention and continuing through Short‐term Injury Management, Long‐term Injury Management, and culminating in Return to Full Training. Responses also revealed that the coach plays a pivotal role in the technical coaching aspects of injury prevention and management, and also performs a critical role in the social support of injured athletes as they rehabilitate and transition back to full training. Study Two leveraged knowledge from Study One to develop a profiling tool to measure the degree of coach‐implemented injury prevention and management behaviours as well as the perceived importance of those behaviours. The Injury Prevention and Management Profile for Swimming (IPMP‐S), was comprised of four sections of the injury prevention and management cycle from Study One and included specific behaviours for injury prevention and management. The IPMP‐S was administered to high performance coaches (N=18) and swimmers (N=135) from the United States and Australia. Results of a series of repeated measures Analyses of Variance (ANOVA) revealed that swimmers and coaches rated the importance of injury prevention and management behaviours significantly higher than the degree to which they perceived their coach (or the coach self‐reported) to enact those behaviours.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Prevention and management of injury in competitive swimming'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this