Preliminary investigation of trauma inflicted using sharp blades and hacking implements with focus on scanning electron microscopy to distinguish weapon and blade sub-type

Paul Grant Annand

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

With the increasing importance in the examination of skeletal trauma, there is an associated need for adequate standards to aid in the provisioning of correct interpretations. This project investigates the lack of standards for sharp force trauma analysis in forensic anthropology. Using pig skulls, a variety of blades will be tested to determine if macroscopic and microscopic characteristics can be used to differentiate between sub-classes of blades. The present project will quantify microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of sharp force trauma, with the specific objective of devising a standardised method of accurately differentiating between blade types used to inflict the trauma.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date4 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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