Preempting performance challenges: The effects of inoculation messaging on attacks to task self-efficacy

Ben Jackson, J. Compton, Ryan Whiddett, David Anthony, James Dimmock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 Jackson et al. Although inoculation messages have been shown to be effective for inducing resistance to counter-attitudinal attacks, researchers have devoted relatively little attention toward studying the way in which inoculation theory principles might support challenges to psychological phenomena other than attitudes (e.g., self-efficacy). Prior to completing a physical (i.e., balance) task, undergraduates (N = 127, Mage = 19.20, SD = 2.16) were randomly assigned to receive either a control or inoculation message, and reported their confidence in their ability regarding the upcoming task. During the task, a confederate provided standardized negative feedback to all participants regarding their performance, and following the completion of the task, participants again reported their self-efficacy along with measures assessing intask processes. Findings supported the viability of efficacy inoculation; controlling for pre-task self-efficacy, task performance, and relevant psycho-social variables (e.g., resilience, self-confidence robustness), participants in the inoculation condition reported greater confidence in their ability (i.e., task self-efficacy) than those in the control condition at post-task. Relative to those in the inoculation condition, participants in the control condition also experienced greater concentration disruption and self-presentation concerns during the task.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-20
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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self-efficacy
Self Efficacy
Aptitude
Task Performance and Analysis
college students
Feedback
researchers
Research Personnel
viability
Psychology
preempt

Cite this

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title = "Preempting performance challenges: The effects of inoculation messaging on attacks to task self-efficacy",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Jackson et al. Although inoculation messages have been shown to be effective for inducing resistance to counter-attitudinal attacks, researchers have devoted relatively little attention toward studying the way in which inoculation theory principles might support challenges to psychological phenomena other than attitudes (e.g., self-efficacy). Prior to completing a physical (i.e., balance) task, undergraduates (N = 127, Mage = 19.20, SD = 2.16) were randomly assigned to receive either a control or inoculation message, and reported their confidence in their ability regarding the upcoming task. During the task, a confederate provided standardized negative feedback to all participants regarding their performance, and following the completion of the task, participants again reported their self-efficacy along with measures assessing intask processes. Findings supported the viability of efficacy inoculation; controlling for pre-task self-efficacy, task performance, and relevant psycho-social variables (e.g., resilience, self-confidence robustness), participants in the inoculation condition reported greater confidence in their ability (i.e., task self-efficacy) than those in the control condition at post-task. Relative to those in the inoculation condition, participants in the control condition also experienced greater concentration disruption and self-presentation concerns during the task.",
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Preempting performance challenges: The effects of inoculation messaging on attacks to task self-efficacy. / Jackson, Ben; Compton, J.; Whiddett, Ryan; Anthony, David; Dimmock, James.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2015, p. 1-20.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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