Predicting performance of junior doctors: Association of workplace based assessment with demographic characteristics, emotional intelligence, selection scores, and undergraduate academic performance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Predicting workplace performance of junior doctors from before entry or during medical school is difficult and has limited available evidence. This study explored the association between selected predictor variables and workplace based performance in junior doctors during their first postgraduate year. Methods: Two cohorts of medical students (n = 200) from one university in Western Australia participated in the longitudinal study. Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate analyses utilizing linear regression were used to assess the relationships between performance on the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool (JDAT) and its sub-components with demographic characteristics, selection scores for medical school entry, emotional intelligence, and undergraduate academic performance. Results: Grade Point Average (GPA) at the completion of undergraduate studies had the most significant association with better performance on the overall JDAT and each subscale. Increased age was a negative predictor for junior doctor performance on the Clinical management subscale and understanding emotion was a predictor for the JDAT Communication subscale. Secondary school performance measured by Tertiary Entry Rank on entry to medical school score predicted GPA but not junior doctor performance. Discussion: The GPA as a composite measure of ability and performance in medical school is associated with junior doctor assessment scores. Using this variable to identify students at risk of difficulty could assist planning for appropriate supervision, support, and training for medical graduates transitioning to the workplace.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1175-1182
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume40
Issue number11
Early online date21 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Emotional Intelligence
emotional intelligence
Medical Schools
Workplace
workplace
Demography
performance
Training Support
Western Australia
Aptitude
Medical Students
Longitudinal Studies
Linear Models
school
Emotions
Multivariate Analysis
Communication
Students
supervision
medical student

Cite this

@article{ce0b5af0130a4d06a80da9e62ac07365,
title = "Predicting performance of junior doctors: Association of workplace based assessment with demographic characteristics, emotional intelligence, selection scores, and undergraduate academic performance",
abstract = "Introduction: Predicting workplace performance of junior doctors from before entry or during medical school is difficult and has limited available evidence. This study explored the association between selected predictor variables and workplace based performance in junior doctors during their first postgraduate year. Methods: Two cohorts of medical students (n = 200) from one university in Western Australia participated in the longitudinal study. Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate analyses utilizing linear regression were used to assess the relationships between performance on the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool (JDAT) and its sub-components with demographic characteristics, selection scores for medical school entry, emotional intelligence, and undergraduate academic performance. Results: Grade Point Average (GPA) at the completion of undergraduate studies had the most significant association with better performance on the overall JDAT and each subscale. Increased age was a negative predictor for junior doctor performance on the Clinical management subscale and understanding emotion was a predictor for the JDAT Communication subscale. Secondary school performance measured by Tertiary Entry Rank on entry to medical school score predicted GPA but not junior doctor performance. Discussion: The GPA as a composite measure of ability and performance in medical school is associated with junior doctor assessment scores. Using this variable to identify students at risk of difficulty could assist planning for appropriate supervision, support, and training for medical graduates transitioning to the workplace.",
author = "Carr, {Sandra E.} and Antonio Celenza and Mercer, {Annette M.} and Fiona Lake and Puddey, {Ian B.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/0142159X.2018.1426840",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "1175--1182",
journal = "Medical Teacher",
issn = "0142-159X",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare USA",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting performance of junior doctors

T2 - Association of workplace based assessment with demographic characteristics, emotional intelligence, selection scores, and undergraduate academic performance

AU - Carr, Sandra E.

AU - Celenza, Antonio

AU - Mercer, Annette M.

AU - Lake, Fiona

AU - Puddey, Ian B.

PY - 2018/11/2

Y1 - 2018/11/2

N2 - Introduction: Predicting workplace performance of junior doctors from before entry or during medical school is difficult and has limited available evidence. This study explored the association between selected predictor variables and workplace based performance in junior doctors during their first postgraduate year. Methods: Two cohorts of medical students (n = 200) from one university in Western Australia participated in the longitudinal study. Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate analyses utilizing linear regression were used to assess the relationships between performance on the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool (JDAT) and its sub-components with demographic characteristics, selection scores for medical school entry, emotional intelligence, and undergraduate academic performance. Results: Grade Point Average (GPA) at the completion of undergraduate studies had the most significant association with better performance on the overall JDAT and each subscale. Increased age was a negative predictor for junior doctor performance on the Clinical management subscale and understanding emotion was a predictor for the JDAT Communication subscale. Secondary school performance measured by Tertiary Entry Rank on entry to medical school score predicted GPA but not junior doctor performance. Discussion: The GPA as a composite measure of ability and performance in medical school is associated with junior doctor assessment scores. Using this variable to identify students at risk of difficulty could assist planning for appropriate supervision, support, and training for medical graduates transitioning to the workplace.

AB - Introduction: Predicting workplace performance of junior doctors from before entry or during medical school is difficult and has limited available evidence. This study explored the association between selected predictor variables and workplace based performance in junior doctors during their first postgraduate year. Methods: Two cohorts of medical students (n = 200) from one university in Western Australia participated in the longitudinal study. Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate analyses utilizing linear regression were used to assess the relationships between performance on the Junior Doctor Assessment Tool (JDAT) and its sub-components with demographic characteristics, selection scores for medical school entry, emotional intelligence, and undergraduate academic performance. Results: Grade Point Average (GPA) at the completion of undergraduate studies had the most significant association with better performance on the overall JDAT and each subscale. Increased age was a negative predictor for junior doctor performance on the Clinical management subscale and understanding emotion was a predictor for the JDAT Communication subscale. Secondary school performance measured by Tertiary Entry Rank on entry to medical school score predicted GPA but not junior doctor performance. Discussion: The GPA as a composite measure of ability and performance in medical school is associated with junior doctor assessment scores. Using this variable to identify students at risk of difficulty could assist planning for appropriate supervision, support, and training for medical graduates transitioning to the workplace.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040969383&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1426840

DO - 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1426840

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 1175

EP - 1182

JO - Medical Teacher

JF - Medical Teacher

SN - 0142-159X

IS - 11

ER -