Predators help protect carbon stocks in blue carbon ecosystems

T.B. Atwood, R.M. Connolly, E.G. Ritchie, C.E. Lovelock, M.R. Heithaus, G.C. Hays, James Fourqurean, P.I. Macreadie

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    141 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Predators continue to be harvested unsustainably throughout most of the Earth's ecosystems. Recent research demonstrates that the functional loss of predators could have far-reaching consequences on carbon cycling and, by implication, our ability to ameliorate climate change impacts. Yet the influence of predators on carbon accumulation and preservation in vegetated coastal habitats (that is, salt marshes, seagrass meadows and mangroves) is poorly understood, despite these being some of the Earth's most vulnerable and carbon-rich ecosystems. Here we discuss potential pathways by which trophic downgrading affects carbon capture, accumulation and preservation in vegetated coastal habitats. We identify an urgent need for further research on the influence of predators on carbon cycling in vegetated coastal habitats, and ultimately the role that these systems play in climate change mitigation. There is, however, sufficient evidence to suggest that intact predator populations are critical to maintaining or growing reserves of 'blue carbon' (carbon stored in coastal or marine ecosystems), and policy and management need to be improved to reflect these realities.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1038-1045
    Number of pages8
    JournalNature Climate Change
    Volume5
    Issue number12
    Early online date28 Sep 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2015

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