Potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage

Annette K. Regan, Paul Effler, Chloe Thomson, Donna B. Mak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background

Despite the maternal and infant health benefits of antenatal vaccines and availability of government-funded vaccination programs, Australia does not have a national system for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage. We evaluated the potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System (MNS) as a tool for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage.

Methods

Two hundred and sixty-eight women who gave birth to a live infant between August and October 2016 participated in a telephone survey of vaccines received in their most recent pregnancy. For women who reported receiving influenza and/or pertussis vaccine and whose vaccination status was documented by their vaccine provider, MNS vaccination data were compared with the vaccine provider's record as the 'gold standard'. For women who reported receiving no vaccines, MNS vaccination data were compared with self-reported information.

Results

Influenza and pertussis vaccination status was complete (i.e. documented as either vaccinated or not vaccinated) for 66% and 63% of women, respectively. Sensitivity of MNS influenza vaccination data was 65.7% (95% CI 56.0-74.2%) and specificity was 53.0% (95% CI 42.4-63.4%). Sensitivity of MNS pertussis vaccination data was 62.5% (95% CI 53.3-70.9%) and specificity was 40.4% (95% CI 27.6-54.7%). There was no difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in the proportion of MNS records with missing or unknown vaccination information. When considering only MNS records with complete vaccination information, the sensitivity of the MNS influenza vaccination field was 91.8% (95% CI 83.0-96.9%) and the sensitivity of the MNS pertussis vaccination field was 88.0% (95% CI 76.7-95.5%).

Conclusion

Due to the high proportion of records with missing or unknown vaccination status, we observed low sensitivity and specificity of antenatal vaccination data in the MNS. However, given we did not observe differential ascertainment by vaccination status, MNS records with complete information may be reliable data source for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalCommunicable Diseases Intelligence
Volume43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jun 2019

Cite this

@article{96e6e2073b814912a7eee1b5b268252c,
title = "Potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage",
abstract = "BackgroundDespite the maternal and infant health benefits of antenatal vaccines and availability of government-funded vaccination programs, Australia does not have a national system for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage. We evaluated the potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System (MNS) as a tool for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage.MethodsTwo hundred and sixty-eight women who gave birth to a live infant between August and October 2016 participated in a telephone survey of vaccines received in their most recent pregnancy. For women who reported receiving influenza and/or pertussis vaccine and whose vaccination status was documented by their vaccine provider, MNS vaccination data were compared with the vaccine provider's record as the 'gold standard'. For women who reported receiving no vaccines, MNS vaccination data were compared with self-reported information.ResultsInfluenza and pertussis vaccination status was complete (i.e. documented as either vaccinated or not vaccinated) for 66{\%} and 63{\%} of women, respectively. Sensitivity of MNS influenza vaccination data was 65.7{\%} (95{\%} CI 56.0-74.2{\%}) and specificity was 53.0{\%} (95{\%} CI 42.4-63.4{\%}). Sensitivity of MNS pertussis vaccination data was 62.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 53.3-70.9{\%}) and specificity was 40.4{\%} (95{\%} CI 27.6-54.7{\%}). There was no difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in the proportion of MNS records with missing or unknown vaccination information. When considering only MNS records with complete vaccination information, the sensitivity of the MNS influenza vaccination field was 91.8{\%} (95{\%} CI 83.0-96.9{\%}) and the sensitivity of the MNS pertussis vaccination field was 88.0{\%} (95{\%} CI 76.7-95.5{\%}).ConclusionDue to the high proportion of records with missing or unknown vaccination status, we observed low sensitivity and specificity of antenatal vaccination data in the MNS. However, given we did not observe differential ascertainment by vaccination status, MNS records with complete information may be reliable data source for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage.",
keywords = "Antenatal vaccination, pregnancy, vaccine surveillance, vaccine coverage, influenza vaccine, pertussis vaccine, public health, evaluation, INFLUENZA VACCINATION, PREGNANT-WOMEN, PERTUSSIS VACCINATION, IMMUNIZATION, DIPHTHERIA, TETANUS, MOTHERS",
author = "Regan, {Annette K.} and Paul Effler and Chloe Thomson and Mak, {Donna B.}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "17",
doi = "10.33321/cdi.2019.43.21",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
journal = "Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)",
issn = "0725-3141",
publisher = "Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing",

}

Potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage. / Regan, Annette K.; Effler, Paul; Thomson, Chloe; Mak, Donna B.

In: Communicable Diseases Intelligence, Vol. 43, 17.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage

AU - Regan, Annette K.

AU - Effler, Paul

AU - Thomson, Chloe

AU - Mak, Donna B.

PY - 2019/6/17

Y1 - 2019/6/17

N2 - BackgroundDespite the maternal and infant health benefits of antenatal vaccines and availability of government-funded vaccination programs, Australia does not have a national system for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage. We evaluated the potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System (MNS) as a tool for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage.MethodsTwo hundred and sixty-eight women who gave birth to a live infant between August and October 2016 participated in a telephone survey of vaccines received in their most recent pregnancy. For women who reported receiving influenza and/or pertussis vaccine and whose vaccination status was documented by their vaccine provider, MNS vaccination data were compared with the vaccine provider's record as the 'gold standard'. For women who reported receiving no vaccines, MNS vaccination data were compared with self-reported information.ResultsInfluenza and pertussis vaccination status was complete (i.e. documented as either vaccinated or not vaccinated) for 66% and 63% of women, respectively. Sensitivity of MNS influenza vaccination data was 65.7% (95% CI 56.0-74.2%) and specificity was 53.0% (95% CI 42.4-63.4%). Sensitivity of MNS pertussis vaccination data was 62.5% (95% CI 53.3-70.9%) and specificity was 40.4% (95% CI 27.6-54.7%). There was no difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in the proportion of MNS records with missing or unknown vaccination information. When considering only MNS records with complete vaccination information, the sensitivity of the MNS influenza vaccination field was 91.8% (95% CI 83.0-96.9%) and the sensitivity of the MNS pertussis vaccination field was 88.0% (95% CI 76.7-95.5%).ConclusionDue to the high proportion of records with missing or unknown vaccination status, we observed low sensitivity and specificity of antenatal vaccination data in the MNS. However, given we did not observe differential ascertainment by vaccination status, MNS records with complete information may be reliable data source for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage.

AB - BackgroundDespite the maternal and infant health benefits of antenatal vaccines and availability of government-funded vaccination programs, Australia does not have a national system for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage. We evaluated the potential use of Western Australia's mandatory Midwives Notification System (MNS) as a tool for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccination coverage.MethodsTwo hundred and sixty-eight women who gave birth to a live infant between August and October 2016 participated in a telephone survey of vaccines received in their most recent pregnancy. For women who reported receiving influenza and/or pertussis vaccine and whose vaccination status was documented by their vaccine provider, MNS vaccination data were compared with the vaccine provider's record as the 'gold standard'. For women who reported receiving no vaccines, MNS vaccination data were compared with self-reported information.ResultsInfluenza and pertussis vaccination status was complete (i.e. documented as either vaccinated or not vaccinated) for 66% and 63% of women, respectively. Sensitivity of MNS influenza vaccination data was 65.7% (95% CI 56.0-74.2%) and specificity was 53.0% (95% CI 42.4-63.4%). Sensitivity of MNS pertussis vaccination data was 62.5% (95% CI 53.3-70.9%) and specificity was 40.4% (95% CI 27.6-54.7%). There was no difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in the proportion of MNS records with missing or unknown vaccination information. When considering only MNS records with complete vaccination information, the sensitivity of the MNS influenza vaccination field was 91.8% (95% CI 83.0-96.9%) and the sensitivity of the MNS pertussis vaccination field was 88.0% (95% CI 76.7-95.5%).ConclusionDue to the high proportion of records with missing or unknown vaccination status, we observed low sensitivity and specificity of antenatal vaccination data in the MNS. However, given we did not observe differential ascertainment by vaccination status, MNS records with complete information may be reliable data source for routinely monitoring antenatal vaccine coverage.

KW - Antenatal vaccination

KW - pregnancy

KW - vaccine surveillance

KW - vaccine coverage

KW - influenza vaccine

KW - pertussis vaccine

KW - public health

KW - evaluation

KW - INFLUENZA VACCINATION

KW - PREGNANT-WOMEN

KW - PERTUSSIS VACCINATION

KW - IMMUNIZATION

KW - DIPHTHERIA

KW - TETANUS

KW - MOTHERS

U2 - 10.33321/cdi.2019.43.21

DO - 10.33321/cdi.2019.43.21

M3 - Article

VL - 43

JO - Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)

JF - Communicable Diseases Intelligence (Australia)

SN - 0725-3141

ER -