Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life

Y.K. Chen, J.F. Qu, W.M. Xiao, W.Y. Li, H.Y. Weng, W. Li, Y.L. Liu, G.P. Luo, X.W. Fang, Gabor Ungvari, Y.T. Xiang

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    © 2014 World Stroke Organization. Background: Fatigue is a common problem in ischemic stroke survivors. The mechanisms of poststroke fatigue are uncertain yet. The effects of it on functional status have rarely been studied. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of poststroke fatigue and its effect on activities of daily living and health-related quality of life in Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. Methods: Two hundred and eighteen patients with ischemic stroke formed the study sample. A comprehensive assessment, including the Fatigue Severity Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Lawton activities of daily living scale, and the stroke-specific quality of life scale, was conducted three-months after stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging scans focused on the evaluation of infarctions, white matter lesions, and brain atrophy. Results: In the whole sample, with Fatigue Severity Scale as the dependent variable in a linear regression model, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, prestroke fatigue, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission were significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 36% of the variance of it. When subjects with depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale≥20 or current usage of antidepressants) were excluded, only Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and prestroke fatigue remained significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 33% of the variance of Fatigue Severity Scale. No magnetic resonance imaging variables correlated with Fatigue Severity Scale. In bivariate correlation analyses, Fatigue Severity Scale was significantly correlated with both activities of daily living and stroke-specific quality of life. In linear regression models, Fatigue Severity Scale independently contributed to activities of daily living accounting for 27% of the variance. Fatigue Severity Scale was also a significant contributor to stroke-specific quality of life accounting for 39% of the variance. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and prestroke fatigue are major correlates of poststroke fatigue while more severe poststroke fatigue is associated with poorer activities of daily living and health-related quality of life.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)506-512
    JournalInternational Journal of Stroke
    Volume10
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Fatigue
    Quality of Life
    Stroke
    Activities of Daily Living
    Depression
    Linear Models
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
    Infarction
    Antidepressive Agents
    Atrophy
    Survivors

    Cite this

    Chen, Y. K., Qu, J. F., Xiao, W. M., Li, W. Y., Weng, H. Y., Li, W., ... Xiang, Y. T. (2015). Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life. International Journal of Stroke, 10(4), 506-512. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijs.12409
    Chen, Y.K. ; Qu, J.F. ; Xiao, W.M. ; Li, W.Y. ; Weng, H.Y. ; Li, W. ; Liu, Y.L. ; Luo, G.P. ; Fang, X.W. ; Ungvari, Gabor ; Xiang, Y.T. / Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life. In: International Journal of Stroke. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 506-512.
    @article{87928cf2edeb45c58477adb65fc67f29,
    title = "Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2014 World Stroke Organization. Background: Fatigue is a common problem in ischemic stroke survivors. The mechanisms of poststroke fatigue are uncertain yet. The effects of it on functional status have rarely been studied. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of poststroke fatigue and its effect on activities of daily living and health-related quality of life in Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. Methods: Two hundred and eighteen patients with ischemic stroke formed the study sample. A comprehensive assessment, including the Fatigue Severity Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Lawton activities of daily living scale, and the stroke-specific quality of life scale, was conducted three-months after stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging scans focused on the evaluation of infarctions, white matter lesions, and brain atrophy. Results: In the whole sample, with Fatigue Severity Scale as the dependent variable in a linear regression model, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, prestroke fatigue, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission were significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 36{\%} of the variance of it. When subjects with depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale≥20 or current usage of antidepressants) were excluded, only Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and prestroke fatigue remained significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 33{\%} of the variance of Fatigue Severity Scale. No magnetic resonance imaging variables correlated with Fatigue Severity Scale. In bivariate correlation analyses, Fatigue Severity Scale was significantly correlated with both activities of daily living and stroke-specific quality of life. In linear regression models, Fatigue Severity Scale independently contributed to activities of daily living accounting for 27{\%} of the variance. Fatigue Severity Scale was also a significant contributor to stroke-specific quality of life accounting for 39{\%} of the variance. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and prestroke fatigue are major correlates of poststroke fatigue while more severe poststroke fatigue is associated with poorer activities of daily living and health-related quality of life.",
    author = "Y.K. Chen and J.F. Qu and W.M. Xiao and W.Y. Li and H.Y. Weng and W. Li and Y.L. Liu and G.P. Luo and X.W. Fang and Gabor Ungvari and Y.T. Xiang",
    year = "2015",
    doi = "10.1111/ijs.12409",
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    Chen, YK, Qu, JF, Xiao, WM, Li, WY, Weng, HY, Li, W, Liu, YL, Luo, GP, Fang, XW, Ungvari, G & Xiang, YT 2015, 'Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life' International Journal of Stroke, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 506-512. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijs.12409

    Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life. / Chen, Y.K.; Qu, J.F.; Xiao, W.M.; Li, W.Y.; Weng, H.Y.; Li, W.; Liu, Y.L.; Luo, G.P.; Fang, X.W.; Ungvari, Gabor; Xiang, Y.T.

    In: International Journal of Stroke, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2015, p. 506-512.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Poststroke fatigue: Risk factors and its effect on functional status and health-related quality of life

    AU - Chen, Y.K.

    AU - Qu, J.F.

    AU - Xiao, W.M.

    AU - Li, W.Y.

    AU - Weng, H.Y.

    AU - Li, W.

    AU - Liu, Y.L.

    AU - Luo, G.P.

    AU - Fang, X.W.

    AU - Ungvari, Gabor

    AU - Xiang, Y.T.

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - © 2014 World Stroke Organization. Background: Fatigue is a common problem in ischemic stroke survivors. The mechanisms of poststroke fatigue are uncertain yet. The effects of it on functional status have rarely been studied. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of poststroke fatigue and its effect on activities of daily living and health-related quality of life in Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. Methods: Two hundred and eighteen patients with ischemic stroke formed the study sample. A comprehensive assessment, including the Fatigue Severity Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Lawton activities of daily living scale, and the stroke-specific quality of life scale, was conducted three-months after stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging scans focused on the evaluation of infarctions, white matter lesions, and brain atrophy. Results: In the whole sample, with Fatigue Severity Scale as the dependent variable in a linear regression model, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, prestroke fatigue, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission were significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 36% of the variance of it. When subjects with depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale≥20 or current usage of antidepressants) were excluded, only Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and prestroke fatigue remained significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 33% of the variance of Fatigue Severity Scale. No magnetic resonance imaging variables correlated with Fatigue Severity Scale. In bivariate correlation analyses, Fatigue Severity Scale was significantly correlated with both activities of daily living and stroke-specific quality of life. In linear regression models, Fatigue Severity Scale independently contributed to activities of daily living accounting for 27% of the variance. Fatigue Severity Scale was also a significant contributor to stroke-specific quality of life accounting for 39% of the variance. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and prestroke fatigue are major correlates of poststroke fatigue while more severe poststroke fatigue is associated with poorer activities of daily living and health-related quality of life.

    AB - © 2014 World Stroke Organization. Background: Fatigue is a common problem in ischemic stroke survivors. The mechanisms of poststroke fatigue are uncertain yet. The effects of it on functional status have rarely been studied. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors of poststroke fatigue and its effect on activities of daily living and health-related quality of life in Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. Methods: Two hundred and eighteen patients with ischemic stroke formed the study sample. A comprehensive assessment, including the Fatigue Severity Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Lawton activities of daily living scale, and the stroke-specific quality of life scale, was conducted three-months after stroke. Magnetic resonance imaging scans focused on the evaluation of infarctions, white matter lesions, and brain atrophy. Results: In the whole sample, with Fatigue Severity Scale as the dependent variable in a linear regression model, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, prestroke fatigue, and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at admission were significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 36% of the variance of it. When subjects with depression (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale≥20 or current usage of antidepressants) were excluded, only Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and prestroke fatigue remained significant correlates of Fatigue Severity Scale, accounting for 33% of the variance of Fatigue Severity Scale. No magnetic resonance imaging variables correlated with Fatigue Severity Scale. In bivariate correlation analyses, Fatigue Severity Scale was significantly correlated with both activities of daily living and stroke-specific quality of life. In linear regression models, Fatigue Severity Scale independently contributed to activities of daily living accounting for 27% of the variance. Fatigue Severity Scale was also a significant contributor to stroke-specific quality of life accounting for 39% of the variance. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and prestroke fatigue are major correlates of poststroke fatigue while more severe poststroke fatigue is associated with poorer activities of daily living and health-related quality of life.

    U2 - 10.1111/ijs.12409

    DO - 10.1111/ijs.12409

    M3 - Article

    VL - 10

    SP - 506

    EP - 512

    JO - International Journal of Stroke

    JF - International Journal of Stroke

    SN - 1747-4930

    IS - 4

    ER -