Positioning food standards programmes to protect public health: Current performance, future opportunities and necessary reforms

Mark Andrew Lawrence, Christina Mary Pollard, Tarun Stephen Weeramanthri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To assess current performance and identify opportunities and reforms necessary for positioning a food standards programme to help protect public health against dietary risk factors.Design A case study design in which a food standards programme's public health protection performance was analysed against an adapted Donabedian model for assessing health-care quality. The criteria were the food standards programme's structure (governance arrangements and membership of its decision-making committees), process (decision-making tools, public engagement and transparency) and food standards outcomes, which provided the information base on which performance quality was inferred.Setting The Australia and New Zealand food standards programme.Participants The structure, process and outcomes of the Programme.Results The Programme's structure and processes produce food standards outcomes that perform well in protecting public health from risks associated with nutrient intake excess or inadequacy. The Programme performs less well in protecting public health from the proliferation and marketing of 'discretionary' foods that can exacerbate dietary risks. Opportunities to set food standards to help protect public health against dietary risks are identified.Conclusions The structures and decision-making processes used in food standards programmes need to be reformed so they are fit for purpose for helping combat dietary risks caused by dietary excess and imbalances. Priorities include reforming the risk analysis framework, including the nutrient profiling scoring criterion, by extending their nutrition science orientation from a nutrient (reductionist) paradigm to be more inclusive of a food/diet (holistic) paradigm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-926
Number of pages15
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

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Public Health
Food
Decision Making
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Nutritional Sciences
Quality of Health Care
Marketing
New Zealand
Diet

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective To assess current performance and identify opportunities and reforms necessary for positioning a food standards programme to help protect public health against dietary risk factors.Design A case study design in which a food standards programme's public health protection performance was analysed against an adapted Donabedian model for assessing health-care quality. The criteria were the food standards programme's structure (governance arrangements and membership of its decision-making committees), process (decision-making tools, public engagement and transparency) and food standards outcomes, which provided the information base on which performance quality was inferred.Setting The Australia and New Zealand food standards programme.Participants The structure, process and outcomes of the Programme.Results The Programme's structure and processes produce food standards outcomes that perform well in protecting public health from risks associated with nutrient intake excess or inadequacy. The Programme performs less well in protecting public health from the proliferation and marketing of 'discretionary' foods that can exacerbate dietary risks. Opportunities to set food standards to help protect public health against dietary risks are identified.Conclusions The structures and decision-making processes used in food standards programmes need to be reformed so they are fit for purpose for helping combat dietary risks caused by dietary excess and imbalances. Priorities include reforming the risk analysis framework, including the nutrient profiling scoring criterion, by extending their nutrition science orientation from a nutrient (reductionist) paradigm to be more inclusive of a food/diet (holistic) paradigm.",
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Positioning food standards programmes to protect public health : Current performance, future opportunities and necessary reforms. / Lawrence, Mark Andrew; Pollard, Christina Mary; Weeramanthri, Tarun Stephen.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.04.2019, p. 912-926.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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