Population-based estimates of the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in Australia: Proceedings of the IPDLN Conference (August 2016)

Thomas Snelling, Heather F. Gidding, Hannah Moore, Lisa McCallum, Parveen Fathima, Nicholas De Klerk, Peter McIntyre

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Objectives
Australia’s Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) is one of only a handful of national immunisation registers world-wide. We have, for the first time, linked the ACIR to other health datasets to measure the real-world impact of Australia’s immunisation program. In this study, we aimed to assess the population-based effectiveness of the 3-dose infant pneumococcal vaccination program (due at 2, 4, and 6 months) against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has been available since 2001 and a funded universal program started in 2005 (with a switch to 13-valent PCV in 2011).

Approach
Vaccination records from ACIR, death records, and invasive pneumococcal disease notifications for 2001-2013 were individually linked for 1.37 million children born in 2001-2012 in two Australian states (Western Australia and New South Wales). A Cox proportional hazards model (adjusting for sex, Indigenous status and year of birth) was used to estimate the hazard ratio for invasive pneumococcal disease in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated children less than 2 years old. The per cent of disease prevented by vaccination, or vaccine effectiveness, was calculated as (1-adjusted hazard ratio) x 100%.

Results
From 2005, vaccination coverage with dose 3 of the pneumococcal vaccine was steady at ~91% in eligible cohorts. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 468 notifications of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes during 2.66 million person years of observation; only 39 (8.3%) of these cases occurred after the universal program was implemented. Vaccine effectiveness against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes for 1, 2 and 3 doses of the pneumococcal vaccine was 68% (95%CI: 44-89%), 93% (81-97%), and 92% (95%CI: 86-93%), respectively.

Conclusion
This is the first study to link Australia’s national immunisation register and measure population-based vaccine effectiveness. The study provides robust evidence of the effectiveness of at least 2 doses of pneumococcal vaccine against vaccine serotype specific infection using a 3 dose infant schedule.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

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Vaccination
Vaccines
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Immunization
Population
Disease Notification
Immunization Programs
Conjugate Vaccines
Western Australia
New South Wales
Death Certificates
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Appointments and Schedules
Observation
Parturition
Serogroup
Health
Infection

Cite this

@conference{d9adb837b7b7429b93bcddca00f0858a,
title = "Population-based estimates of the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in Australia: Proceedings of the IPDLN Conference (August 2016)",
abstract = "ABSTRACTObjectivesAustralia’s Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) is one of only a handful of national immunisation registers world-wide. We have, for the first time, linked the ACIR to other health datasets to measure the real-world impact of Australia’s immunisation program. In this study, we aimed to assess the population-based effectiveness of the 3-dose infant pneumococcal vaccination program (due at 2, 4, and 6 months) against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has been available since 2001 and a funded universal program started in 2005 (with a switch to 13-valent PCV in 2011). ApproachVaccination records from ACIR, death records, and invasive pneumococcal disease notifications for 2001-2013 were individually linked for 1.37 million children born in 2001-2012 in two Australian states (Western Australia and New South Wales). A Cox proportional hazards model (adjusting for sex, Indigenous status and year of birth) was used to estimate the hazard ratio for invasive pneumococcal disease in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated children less than 2 years old. The per cent of disease prevented by vaccination, or vaccine effectiveness, was calculated as (1-adjusted hazard ratio) x 100{\%}. ResultsFrom 2005, vaccination coverage with dose 3 of the pneumococcal vaccine was steady at ~91{\%} in eligible cohorts. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 468 notifications of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes during 2.66 million person years of observation; only 39 (8.3{\%}) of these cases occurred after the universal program was implemented. Vaccine effectiveness against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes for 1, 2 and 3 doses of the pneumococcal vaccine was 68{\%} (95{\%}CI: 44-89{\%}), 93{\%} (81-97{\%}), and 92{\%} (95{\%}CI: 86-93{\%}), respectively. ConclusionThis is the first study to link Australia’s national immunisation register and measure population-based vaccine effectiveness. The study provides robust evidence of the effectiveness of at least 2 doses of pneumococcal vaccine against vaccine serotype specific infection using a 3 dose infant schedule.",
author = "Thomas Snelling and Gidding, {Heather F.} and Hannah Moore and Lisa McCallum and Parveen Fathima and {De Klerk}, Nicholas and Peter McIntyre",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
language = "English",

}

Population-based estimates of the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in Australia : Proceedings of the IPDLN Conference (August 2016). / Snelling, Thomas; Gidding, Heather F.; Moore, Hannah; McCallum, Lisa; Fathima, Parveen; De Klerk, Nicholas; McIntyre, Peter.

2017.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Population-based estimates of the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in Australia

T2 - Proceedings of the IPDLN Conference (August 2016)

AU - Snelling, Thomas

AU - Gidding, Heather F.

AU - Moore, Hannah

AU - McCallum, Lisa

AU - Fathima, Parveen

AU - De Klerk, Nicholas

AU - McIntyre, Peter

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - ABSTRACTObjectivesAustralia’s Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) is one of only a handful of national immunisation registers world-wide. We have, for the first time, linked the ACIR to other health datasets to measure the real-world impact of Australia’s immunisation program. In this study, we aimed to assess the population-based effectiveness of the 3-dose infant pneumococcal vaccination program (due at 2, 4, and 6 months) against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has been available since 2001 and a funded universal program started in 2005 (with a switch to 13-valent PCV in 2011). ApproachVaccination records from ACIR, death records, and invasive pneumococcal disease notifications for 2001-2013 were individually linked for 1.37 million children born in 2001-2012 in two Australian states (Western Australia and New South Wales). A Cox proportional hazards model (adjusting for sex, Indigenous status and year of birth) was used to estimate the hazard ratio for invasive pneumococcal disease in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated children less than 2 years old. The per cent of disease prevented by vaccination, or vaccine effectiveness, was calculated as (1-adjusted hazard ratio) x 100%. ResultsFrom 2005, vaccination coverage with dose 3 of the pneumococcal vaccine was steady at ~91% in eligible cohorts. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 468 notifications of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes during 2.66 million person years of observation; only 39 (8.3%) of these cases occurred after the universal program was implemented. Vaccine effectiveness against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes for 1, 2 and 3 doses of the pneumococcal vaccine was 68% (95%CI: 44-89%), 93% (81-97%), and 92% (95%CI: 86-93%), respectively. ConclusionThis is the first study to link Australia’s national immunisation register and measure population-based vaccine effectiveness. The study provides robust evidence of the effectiveness of at least 2 doses of pneumococcal vaccine against vaccine serotype specific infection using a 3 dose infant schedule.

AB - ABSTRACTObjectivesAustralia’s Childhood Immunisation Register (ACIR) is one of only a handful of national immunisation registers world-wide. We have, for the first time, linked the ACIR to other health datasets to measure the real-world impact of Australia’s immunisation program. In this study, we aimed to assess the population-based effectiveness of the 3-dose infant pneumococcal vaccination program (due at 2, 4, and 6 months) against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) has been available since 2001 and a funded universal program started in 2005 (with a switch to 13-valent PCV in 2011). ApproachVaccination records from ACIR, death records, and invasive pneumococcal disease notifications for 2001-2013 were individually linked for 1.37 million children born in 2001-2012 in two Australian states (Western Australia and New South Wales). A Cox proportional hazards model (adjusting for sex, Indigenous status and year of birth) was used to estimate the hazard ratio for invasive pneumococcal disease in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated children less than 2 years old. The per cent of disease prevented by vaccination, or vaccine effectiveness, was calculated as (1-adjusted hazard ratio) x 100%. ResultsFrom 2005, vaccination coverage with dose 3 of the pneumococcal vaccine was steady at ~91% in eligible cohorts. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 468 notifications of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes during 2.66 million person years of observation; only 39 (8.3%) of these cases occurred after the universal program was implemented. Vaccine effectiveness against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the 7 vaccine specific serotypes for 1, 2 and 3 doses of the pneumococcal vaccine was 68% (95%CI: 44-89%), 93% (81-97%), and 92% (95%CI: 86-93%), respectively. ConclusionThis is the first study to link Australia’s national immunisation register and measure population-based vaccine effectiveness. The study provides robust evidence of the effectiveness of at least 2 doses of pneumococcal vaccine against vaccine serotype specific infection using a 3 dose infant schedule.

UR - https://ijpds.org/article/view/221

M3 - Abstract

ER -