Police, public, and arrestee perceptions of body-worn video: a single jurisdictional multiple-perspective analysis

Joseph Clare, Darren Henstock, Christine McComb, Roy Newland, Geoffrey Barnes, Murray Lee, Emmeline Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article analyzes police, public, and arrestee survey responses from a single jurisdiction to give a multiple-perspective insight into the use of body-worn video (BWV) cameras by police. Police attitudinal data were collected from before (n = 190), during (n = 139), and at the conclusion (n = 221) of a BWV implementation trial. Public attitudes were collected at the conclusion of the
BWV implementation trial via online survey (n = 995 respondents) and intercept survey (n = 428 respondents). Arrestee attitudes (n = 302) were collected for detainees in police custody over a 6-month period immediately preceding the BWV trial. Results showed (a) all three perspectives were supportive of the use of BWV, (b) the extent to which police felt BWV influenced their behavior tempered during the trial, (c) the public who had encountered BWV-wearing officers and
the arrestee sample indicated limited belief that BWV would reduce bad behavior, and (d) there was clear contention about the policy and practice decisions around recording. These findings have significance for BWV trials, commenting on the importance of collecting police attitudes at multiple points, separating the attitudes of public who did encounter police-wearing BWV, and data collection/
policy for evaluation outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalCriminal Justice Review
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 May 2019

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