Pole Dancing for Fitness: The Physiological and Metabolic Demand of a 60-Minute Class

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Abstract

Little is understood about the acute physiological or metabolic demand of pole dancing classes. As such, the aims of this study were to quantify the demands of a standardized recreational pole dancing class, classifying outcomes according to American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise-intensity guidelines, and to explore differences in physiological and metabolic measures between skill- and routine-based class components. Fourteen advanced-level amateur female pole dancers completed three 60-minute standardized pole dancing classes. In one class, participants were fitted with a portable metabolic analysis unit. Overall, classes were performed at a mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 of 16.0 ml·kg·min, total energy cost (EC) of 281.6 kcal (4.7 kcal·min), metabolic equivalent of tasks (METs) of 4.6, heart rate of 131 b·min, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) of 6.3/10, and blood lactate of 3.1 mM. When comparing skill- and routine-based components of the class, EC per minute (4.4 vs. 5.3 kcal·min), peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (21.5 vs. 29.6 ml·kg·min), METs (4.3 vs. 5.2), and RPE (7.2 vs. 8.4) were all greater in the routine-based component (p < 0.01), indicating that classes with an increased focus on routine-based training, as compared to skill-based training, may benefit those seeking to exercise at a higher intensity level, resulting in greater caloric expenditure. In accordance with ASCM guidelines, an advanced-level 60-minute pole dancing class can be classified as a moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise; when completed for ≥30 minutes, ≥5 days per week (total ≥150 minutes) satisfies the recommended level of exercise for improved health and cardiorespiratory fitness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2704-2710
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume33
Issue number10
Early online date29 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2019

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Metabolic Equivalent
Guidelines
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Expenditures
Lactic Acid
Heart Rate
Health
Cardiorespiratory Fitness

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title = "Pole Dancing for Fitness: The Physiological and Metabolic Demand of a 60-Minute Class",
abstract = "Little is understood about the acute physiological or metabolic demand of pole dancing classes. As such, the aims of this study were to quantify the demands of a standardized recreational pole dancing class, classifying outcomes according to American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise-intensity guidelines, and to explore differences in physiological and metabolic measures between skill- and routine-based class components. Fourteen advanced-level amateur female pole dancers completed three 60-minute standardized pole dancing classes. In one class, participants were fitted with a portable metabolic analysis unit. Overall, classes were performed at a mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 of 16.0 ml·kg·min, total energy cost (EC) of 281.6 kcal (4.7 kcal·min), metabolic equivalent of tasks (METs) of 4.6, heart rate of 131 b·min, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) of 6.3/10, and blood lactate of 3.1 mM. When comparing skill- and routine-based components of the class, EC per minute (4.4 vs. 5.3 kcal·min), peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (21.5 vs. 29.6 ml·kg·min), METs (4.3 vs. 5.2), and RPE (7.2 vs. 8.4) were all greater in the routine-based component (p < 0.01), indicating that classes with an increased focus on routine-based training, as compared to skill-based training, may benefit those seeking to exercise at a higher intensity level, resulting in greater caloric expenditure. In accordance with ASCM guidelines, an advanced-level 60-minute pole dancing class can be classified as a moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise; when completed for ≥30 minutes, ≥5 days per week (total ≥150 minutes) satisfies the recommended level of exercise for improved health and cardiorespiratory fitness.",
author = "Nicholas, {Joanna C} and McDonald, {Kirsty A} and Peter Peeling and Ben Jackson and Dimmock, {James A} and Alderson, {Jacqueline A} and Donnelly, {Cyril J}",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Pole Dancing for Fitness

T2 - The Physiological and Metabolic Demand of a 60-Minute Class

AU - Nicholas, Joanna C

AU - McDonald, Kirsty A

AU - Peeling, Peter

AU - Jackson, Ben

AU - Dimmock, James A

AU - Alderson, Jacqueline A

AU - Donnelly, Cyril J

PY - 2019/10

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N2 - Little is understood about the acute physiological or metabolic demand of pole dancing classes. As such, the aims of this study were to quantify the demands of a standardized recreational pole dancing class, classifying outcomes according to American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise-intensity guidelines, and to explore differences in physiological and metabolic measures between skill- and routine-based class components. Fourteen advanced-level amateur female pole dancers completed three 60-minute standardized pole dancing classes. In one class, participants were fitted with a portable metabolic analysis unit. Overall, classes were performed at a mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 of 16.0 ml·kg·min, total energy cost (EC) of 281.6 kcal (4.7 kcal·min), metabolic equivalent of tasks (METs) of 4.6, heart rate of 131 b·min, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) of 6.3/10, and blood lactate of 3.1 mM. When comparing skill- and routine-based components of the class, EC per minute (4.4 vs. 5.3 kcal·min), peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (21.5 vs. 29.6 ml·kg·min), METs (4.3 vs. 5.2), and RPE (7.2 vs. 8.4) were all greater in the routine-based component (p < 0.01), indicating that classes with an increased focus on routine-based training, as compared to skill-based training, may benefit those seeking to exercise at a higher intensity level, resulting in greater caloric expenditure. In accordance with ASCM guidelines, an advanced-level 60-minute pole dancing class can be classified as a moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise; when completed for ≥30 minutes, ≥5 days per week (total ≥150 minutes) satisfies the recommended level of exercise for improved health and cardiorespiratory fitness.

AB - Little is understood about the acute physiological or metabolic demand of pole dancing classes. As such, the aims of this study were to quantify the demands of a standardized recreational pole dancing class, classifying outcomes according to American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise-intensity guidelines, and to explore differences in physiological and metabolic measures between skill- and routine-based class components. Fourteen advanced-level amateur female pole dancers completed three 60-minute standardized pole dancing classes. In one class, participants were fitted with a portable metabolic analysis unit. Overall, classes were performed at a mean V[Combining Dot Above]O2 of 16.0 ml·kg·min, total energy cost (EC) of 281.6 kcal (4.7 kcal·min), metabolic equivalent of tasks (METs) of 4.6, heart rate of 131 b·min, rate of perceived exertion (RPE) of 6.3/10, and blood lactate of 3.1 mM. When comparing skill- and routine-based components of the class, EC per minute (4.4 vs. 5.3 kcal·min), peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (21.5 vs. 29.6 ml·kg·min), METs (4.3 vs. 5.2), and RPE (7.2 vs. 8.4) were all greater in the routine-based component (p < 0.01), indicating that classes with an increased focus on routine-based training, as compared to skill-based training, may benefit those seeking to exercise at a higher intensity level, resulting in greater caloric expenditure. In accordance with ASCM guidelines, an advanced-level 60-minute pole dancing class can be classified as a moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise; when completed for ≥30 minutes, ≥5 days per week (total ≥150 minutes) satisfies the recommended level of exercise for improved health and cardiorespiratory fitness.

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DO - 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002889

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JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

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