Pleistocene occupation of Yellabidde Cave in the northern Swan Coastal Plain, southwestern Australia

Carly Monks, Joe Dortch, G. Jacobsen, A. Baynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

© 2016 Australian Archaeological Association.Evidence for human occupation of Western Australia’s northern Swan Coastal Plain derives mainly from Holocene coastal midden sites. Here, we present preliminary results from archaeological investigations at Yellabidde Cave, located 9 km inland from the present coast. Excavations in the limestone cave’s sandy floor deposit revealed cultural and palaeontological materials dating from c. 25,500 cal. BP to the 19th C. These provide the first evidence for Pleistocene occupation in the region, indicating that Yellabidde Cave was intermittently occupied throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene, and reflecting dynamic human-environment relationships in present near-coastal to littoral environments.
LanguageEnglish
Pages275-279
JournalAustralian Archaeology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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occupation
human-environment relationship
present
evidence
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Pleistocene

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title = "Pleistocene occupation of Yellabidde Cave in the northern Swan Coastal Plain, southwestern Australia",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Australian Archaeological Association.Evidence for human occupation of Western Australia’s northern Swan Coastal Plain derives mainly from Holocene coastal midden sites. Here, we present preliminary results from archaeological investigations at Yellabidde Cave, located 9 km inland from the present coast. Excavations in the limestone cave’s sandy floor deposit revealed cultural and palaeontological materials dating from c. 25,500 cal. BP to the 19th C. These provide the first evidence for Pleistocene occupation in the region, indicating that Yellabidde Cave was intermittently occupied throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene, and reflecting dynamic human-environment relationships in present near-coastal to littoral environments.",
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Pleistocene occupation of Yellabidde Cave in the northern Swan Coastal Plain, southwestern Australia. / Monks, Carly; Dortch, Joe; Jacobsen, G.; Baynes, A.

In: Australian Archaeology, Vol. 82, No. 3, 2016, p. 275-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - © 2016 Australian Archaeological Association.Evidence for human occupation of Western Australia’s northern Swan Coastal Plain derives mainly from Holocene coastal midden sites. Here, we present preliminary results from archaeological investigations at Yellabidde Cave, located 9 km inland from the present coast. Excavations in the limestone cave’s sandy floor deposit revealed cultural and palaeontological materials dating from c. 25,500 cal. BP to the 19th C. These provide the first evidence for Pleistocene occupation in the region, indicating that Yellabidde Cave was intermittently occupied throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene, and reflecting dynamic human-environment relationships in present near-coastal to littoral environments.

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DO - 10.1080/03122417.2016.1244216

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