Plasticity induced by low-intensity repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: investigations in mouse models

Kalina Patricia Irena Makowiecki

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    430 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate brain activity in humans, however, underlying mechanisms are unclear. This thesis examined low-intensity-rTMS (LI-rTMS) in mouse models of normal (wildtype) and abnormal neural circuitry (ephrin-A knockouts). Chronic Ll-rTMS did not affect learning or dendritic spine densities in normal systems. In ephrin­-A2A5 knockouts, Ll-rTMS improved abnormal visual pathway topography and upregulated brain derived neurotrophic factor. Ll­ rTMS increased parvalbumin inhibitory neuron immunoreactivity in both genotypes, but increased visual cortical excitability only in wildtypes with concurrent visually-evoked activity. Results demonstrate network-level plasticity, linked to possible molecular mechanisms, and reveal interactions between Ll-rTMS and neural activity.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Award date28 Apr 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusUnpublished - 2017

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