Plantar Pressure Measurements and Geometric Analysis of Patients With and Without Morton’s Neuroma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this research was to see if there were any differences in peak pressure, contact time, pressure-time integrals, and geometric variables such as forefoot width, foot length, coefficient of spreading, and arch index between subjects with Morton’s neuroma (MN) and control subjects. Methods: Dynamic peak plantar pressure, contact time, pressure-time integral, and geometric data were extracted using the EMED-X platform in 52 subjects with MN and 31 control subjects. Differences in peak pressure, contact time, pressure-time integral, and geometric data between participants with and those without MN were determined using independent-samples t tests. There were no significant differences in age, weight, height, and body mass index between patients with MN and control subjects. Results: There were no significant differences in the peak pressures of all masked areas and pressure-time integrals under metatarsal 2 to 4 heads between patients with MN and control subjects. In addition, no significant differences were observed between patients with MN and control subjects in geometric measurements of forefoot length, width, coefficient of spreading, foot progression angle, and arch index. Conclusion: No relationship was found in this study between peak pressure, contact time, and pressure-time integral under the metatarsal heads, forefoot width, foot length, coefficient of spreading, and foot progression angle in a symptomatic MN group compared with a control group. The need to perform osteotomies to treat MN not associated with other lesser metatarsal phalangeal joint pathologies is questionable. Level of Evidence: Level III, Case-Control Study

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)829-835
JournalFoot and Ankle International
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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Pressure
Metatarsal Bones
Foot
Morton Neuroma
Osteotomy
Case-Control Studies
Body Mass Index
Joints
Head
Pathology
Weights and Measures
Control Groups
Research

Cite this

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title = "Plantar Pressure Measurements and Geometric Analysis of Patients With and Without Morton’s Neuroma",
abstract = "Background: The purpose of this research was to see if there were any differences in peak pressure, contact time, pressure-time integrals, and geometric variables such as forefoot width, foot length, coefficient of spreading, and arch index between subjects with Morton’s neuroma (MN) and control subjects. Methods: Dynamic peak plantar pressure, contact time, pressure-time integral, and geometric data were extracted using the EMED-X platform in 52 subjects with MN and 31 control subjects. Differences in peak pressure, contact time, pressure-time integral, and geometric data between participants with and those without MN were determined using independent-samples t tests. There were no significant differences in age, weight, height, and body mass index between patients with MN and control subjects. Results: There were no significant differences in the peak pressures of all masked areas and pressure-time integrals under metatarsal 2 to 4 heads between patients with MN and control subjects. In addition, no significant differences were observed between patients with MN and control subjects in geometric measurements of forefoot length, width, coefficient of spreading, foot progression angle, and arch index. Conclusion: No relationship was found in this study between peak pressure, contact time, and pressure-time integral under the metatarsal heads, forefoot width, foot length, coefficient of spreading, and foot progression angle in a symptomatic MN group compared with a control group. The need to perform osteotomies to treat MN not associated with other lesser metatarsal phalangeal joint pathologies is questionable. Level of Evidence: Level III, Case-Control Study",
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Plantar Pressure Measurements and Geometric Analysis of Patients With and Without Morton’s Neuroma. / Naraghi, R.; Slack-Smith, L.; Bryant, A.

In: Foot and Ankle International, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.07.2018, p. 829-835.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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