Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands

François P. Teste, Paul Kardol, Benjamin L. Turner, David A. Wardle, Graham Zemunik, Michael Renton, Etienne Laliberté

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 31 Citations

Abstract

Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants and negative feedback for nitrogen-fixing and nonmycorrhizal plants. Simulations revealed that such strategy-dependent feedback is sufficient to maintain the high taxonomic and functional diversity characterizing these Mediterranean-climate shrublands. Our study identifies nutrient-acquisition strategy as a key trait explaining how different plant responses to soil biota promote local plant diversity.

LanguageEnglish
Pages173-176
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume355
Issue number6321
DOIs
StatePublished - 13 Jan 2017

Fingerprint

Climate
Soil
Maintenance
Biota
Food
Nitrogen

Cite this

@article{087adf1a07e945e9b3a2f90d7201336a,
title = "Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands",
abstract = "Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants and negative feedback for nitrogen-fixing and nonmycorrhizal plants. Simulations revealed that such strategy-dependent feedback is sufficient to maintain the high taxonomic and functional diversity characterizing these Mediterranean-climate shrublands. Our study identifies nutrient-acquisition strategy as a key trait explaining how different plant responses to soil biota promote local plant diversity.",
author = "Teste, {Fran{\cc}ois P.} and Paul Kardol and Turner, {Benjamin L.} and Wardle, {David A.} and Graham Zemunik and Michael Renton and Etienne Lalibert{\'e}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1126/science.aai8291",
language = "English",
volume = "355",
pages = "173--176",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "AMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE",
number = "6321",

}

Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands. / Teste, François P.; Kardol, Paul; Turner, Benjamin L.; Wardle, David A.; Zemunik, Graham; Renton, Michael; Laliberté, Etienne.

In: Science, Vol. 355, No. 6321, 13.01.2017, p. 173-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands

AU - Teste,François P.

AU - Kardol,Paul

AU - Turner,Benjamin L.

AU - Wardle,David A.

AU - Zemunik,Graham

AU - Renton,Michael

AU - Laliberté,Etienne

PY - 2017/1/13

Y1 - 2017/1/13

N2 - Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants and negative feedback for nitrogen-fixing and nonmycorrhizal plants. Simulations revealed that such strategy-dependent feedback is sufficient to maintain the high taxonomic and functional diversity characterizing these Mediterranean-climate shrublands. Our study identifies nutrient-acquisition strategy as a key trait explaining how different plant responses to soil biota promote local plant diversity.

AB - Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants and negative feedback for nitrogen-fixing and nonmycorrhizal plants. Simulations revealed that such strategy-dependent feedback is sufficient to maintain the high taxonomic and functional diversity characterizing these Mediterranean-climate shrublands. Our study identifies nutrient-acquisition strategy as a key trait explaining how different plant responses to soil biota promote local plant diversity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85009813046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.aai8291

DO - 10.1126/science.aai8291

M3 - Article

VL - 355

SP - 173

EP - 176

JO - Science

T2 - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 6321

ER -