Plant Secondary Compounds (PSC) affect in vitro maturation and fertilisation of oocytes and subsequent embryo development

Anna Amir

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Some pasture species produce plant secondary compounds (PSCs) that are harmful to livestock. To screen plants for PSCs that disrupt reproduction in sheep, we used artificial reproductive technology, specifically In Vitro Maturation, Fertilization and Culture (IVMFC). We showed that this approach would work with isoflavone, a PSC known to cause infertility in sheep. We then tested extracts of several forage plants and found that Biserrula produces a PSC that might benefit reproduction rather than disrupt it. Finally, we used IVMFC to show that the beneficial PSC in Biserrula is loliolide. We now need to transfer these concepts to grazing animals.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Thesis sponsors
Award date9 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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fertilization (reproduction)
oocytes
embryogenesis
sheep
isoflavones
livestock
pastures
grazing
forage
extracts
animals

Cite this

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title = "Plant Secondary Compounds (PSC) affect in vitro maturation and fertilisation of oocytes and subsequent embryo development",
abstract = "Some pasture species produce plant secondary compounds (PSCs) that are harmful to livestock. To screen plants for PSCs that disrupt reproduction in sheep, we used artificial reproductive technology, specifically In Vitro Maturation, Fertilization and Culture (IVMFC). We showed that this approach would work with isoflavone, a PSC known to cause infertility in sheep. We then tested extracts of several forage plants and found that Biserrula produces a PSC that might benefit reproduction rather than disrupt it. Finally, we used IVMFC to show that the beneficial PSC in Biserrula is loliolide. We now need to transfer these concepts to grazing animals.",
keywords = "Plant secondary compounds, embryo development, sheep oocytes, In vitro maturation, IVM, Plant toxicology, In vitro fertilisation, IVF, Biserrula pelecinus",
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school = "The University of Western Australia",

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AB - Some pasture species produce plant secondary compounds (PSCs) that are harmful to livestock. To screen plants for PSCs that disrupt reproduction in sheep, we used artificial reproductive technology, specifically In Vitro Maturation, Fertilization and Culture (IVMFC). We showed that this approach would work with isoflavone, a PSC known to cause infertility in sheep. We then tested extracts of several forage plants and found that Biserrula produces a PSC that might benefit reproduction rather than disrupt it. Finally, we used IVMFC to show that the beneficial PSC in Biserrula is loliolide. We now need to transfer these concepts to grazing animals.

KW - Plant secondary compounds

KW - embryo development

KW - sheep oocytes

KW - In vitro maturation

KW - IVM

KW - Plant toxicology

KW - In vitro fertilisation

KW - IVF

KW - Biserrula pelecinus

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DO - 10.26182/5b552b27a9973

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