Plant growth-regulating molecules as thermoprotectants: functional relevance and prospects for improving heat tolerance in food crops

Lomeshwar Sharma, Manu Priya, Neeru Kaushal, Bhandari Kalpna, Shikha Chaudhary, Om P. Dhanker, P V Vara Prasad, Kadambot Siddique, Harsh Nayyar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Among various abiotic stresses, heat stress is one of the most damaging, threatening plant productivity and survival all over the world. Warmer temperatures due to climatic anomalies above optimum growing temperatures have detrimental impacts on crop yield potential as well as plant distribution patterns. Heat stress affects overall plant metabolism in terms of physiology, biochemistry, and gene expression. Membrane damage, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species are some of the harmful effects of heat stress that cause injury to various cellular compartments. Although plants are equipped with various defense strategies to
counteract these adversities, their defensive means are not sufficient to defend against the ever-rising temperatures. Hence, substantial yield losses have been observed in all crop species under heat stress. Here, we describe the involvement of various plant growth-regulators (PGRs) (hormones, polyamines, osmoprotectants, antioxidants, and other signaling molecules) in thermotolerance, through diverse cellular mechanisms that protect cells under heat stress. Several studies involving the exogenous application of PGRs to heat-stressed plants have demonstrated their role in imparting tolerance, suggesting the strong potential of these molecules in improving the performance of food
crops grown under high temperature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)569-594
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2020

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food crops
heat tolerance
heat stress
Hot Temperature
plant growth
Food
Growth
Temperature
Plant Growth Regulators
plant growth substances
temperature
osmotolerance
enzyme inactivation
Plant Dispersal
protein degradation
polyamines
biochemistry
abiotic stress
Polyamines
crop yield

Cite this

Sharma, Lomeshwar ; Priya, Manu ; Kaushal, Neeru ; Kalpna, Bhandari ; Chaudhary, Shikha ; Dhanker, Om P. ; Vara Prasad, P V ; Siddique, Kadambot ; Nayyar, Harsh. / Plant growth-regulating molecules as thermoprotectants : functional relevance and prospects for improving heat tolerance in food crops. In: Journal of Experimental Botany. 2020 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 569-594.
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Plant growth-regulating molecules as thermoprotectants : functional relevance and prospects for improving heat tolerance in food crops. / Sharma, Lomeshwar; Priya, Manu; Kaushal, Neeru; Kalpna, Bhandari; Chaudhary, Shikha; Dhanker, Om P.; Vara Prasad, P V; Siddique, Kadambot; Nayyar, Harsh.

In: Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol. 71, No. 2, 07.01.2020, p. 569-594.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Plant growth-regulating molecules as thermoprotectants

T2 - functional relevance and prospects for improving heat tolerance in food crops

AU - Sharma, Lomeshwar

AU - Priya, Manu

AU - Kaushal, Neeru

AU - Kalpna, Bhandari

AU - Chaudhary, Shikha

AU - Dhanker, Om P.

AU - Vara Prasad, P V

AU - Siddique, Kadambot

AU - Nayyar, Harsh

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N2 - Among various abiotic stresses, heat stress is one of the most damaging, threatening plant productivity and survival all over the world. Warmer temperatures due to climatic anomalies above optimum growing temperatures have detrimental impacts on crop yield potential as well as plant distribution patterns. Heat stress affects overall plant metabolism in terms of physiology, biochemistry, and gene expression. Membrane damage, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species are some of the harmful effects of heat stress that cause injury to various cellular compartments. Although plants are equipped with various defense strategies tocounteract these adversities, their defensive means are not sufficient to defend against the ever-rising temperatures. Hence, substantial yield losses have been observed in all crop species under heat stress. Here, we describe the involvement of various plant growth-regulators (PGRs) (hormones, polyamines, osmoprotectants, antioxidants, and other signaling molecules) in thermotolerance, through diverse cellular mechanisms that protect cells under heat stress. Several studies involving the exogenous application of PGRs to heat-stressed plants have demonstrated their role in imparting tolerance, suggesting the strong potential of these molecules in improving the performance of foodcrops grown under high temperature.

AB - Among various abiotic stresses, heat stress is one of the most damaging, threatening plant productivity and survival all over the world. Warmer temperatures due to climatic anomalies above optimum growing temperatures have detrimental impacts on crop yield potential as well as plant distribution patterns. Heat stress affects overall plant metabolism in terms of physiology, biochemistry, and gene expression. Membrane damage, protein degradation, enzyme inactivation, and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species are some of the harmful effects of heat stress that cause injury to various cellular compartments. Although plants are equipped with various defense strategies tocounteract these adversities, their defensive means are not sufficient to defend against the ever-rising temperatures. Hence, substantial yield losses have been observed in all crop species under heat stress. Here, we describe the involvement of various plant growth-regulators (PGRs) (hormones, polyamines, osmoprotectants, antioxidants, and other signaling molecules) in thermotolerance, through diverse cellular mechanisms that protect cells under heat stress. Several studies involving the exogenous application of PGRs to heat-stressed plants have demonstrated their role in imparting tolerance, suggesting the strong potential of these molecules in improving the performance of foodcrops grown under high temperature.

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