Physiological characteristics, self-perceptions, and parental support of physical activity in children with, or at risk of, developmental coordination disorder.

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Abstract

Children with low movement proficiency have been identified as having poorer physiological and psychosocial outcomes; however, the varied measurement approaches used to assess these outcomes have varied resulting in conflicting evidence regarding the presence and magnitude of differences compared to Typically Developing (TD) children. Additionally, there has been limited research into the role of parental support for physical activity (PA) in this group. We compared children with varying levels of movement proficiency on physiological characteristics and self-perceptions regarding PA. In addition, these children's parents were compared on physiological characteristics and support of their children's PA. Children (N = 117) aged 6 to 12 years, along with their parent/guardian, participated in this study. Children were classified according to the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 test (Typically Developing (TD) = 60; At Risk = 19; Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) = 38). Children's PA, muscle strength, cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF), body composition, and self-perceptions regarding PA were assessed, with parents assessed on CRF, body composition, and PA support. Compared to TD children, children with DCD had lower PA (p = 0.036), predilection (p ≤0.001) and adequacy (p ≤0.001) regarding PA, higher body fat percentage (p = 0.019), and received less logistic support (i.e., transportation) from their parents (p = 0.012). TD children had increased muscle strength compared to the DCD (p ≤ 0.001) and At Risk (p ≤ 0.001) groups. Results indicated that, relative to TD children, children with DCD have multiple physiological deficits, receive less parental logistic support for PA involvement, and report lower scores on psychological constructs that are predictive of PA involvement.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-74
Number of pages9
JournalResearch in Developmental Disabilities
Volume84
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

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Motor Skills Disorders
Self Concept
Exercise
Parents
Muscle Strength
Body Composition

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title = "Physiological characteristics, self-perceptions, and parental support of physical activity in children with, or at risk of, developmental coordination disorder.",
abstract = "Children with low movement proficiency have been identified as having poorer physiological and psychosocial outcomes; however, the varied measurement approaches used to assess these outcomes have varied resulting in conflicting evidence regarding the presence and magnitude of differences compared to Typically Developing (TD) children. Additionally, there has been limited research into the role of parental support for physical activity (PA) in this group. We compared children with varying levels of movement proficiency on physiological characteristics and self-perceptions regarding PA. In addition, these children's parents were compared on physiological characteristics and support of their children's PA. Children (N = 117) aged 6 to 12 years, along with their parent/guardian, participated in this study. Children were classified according to the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 test (Typically Developing (TD) = 60; At Risk = 19; Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) = 38). Children's PA, muscle strength, cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF), body composition, and self-perceptions regarding PA were assessed, with parents assessed on CRF, body composition, and PA support. Compared to TD children, children with DCD had lower PA (p = 0.036), predilection (p ≤0.001) and adequacy (p ≤0.001) regarding PA, higher body fat percentage (p = 0.019), and received less logistic support (i.e., transportation) from their parents (p = 0.012). TD children had increased muscle strength compared to the DCD (p ≤ 0.001) and At Risk (p ≤ 0.001) groups. Results indicated that, relative to TD children, children with DCD have multiple physiological deficits, receive less parental logistic support for PA involvement, and report lower scores on psychological constructs that are predictive of PA involvement.",
keywords = "Developmental coordination disorder, movement proficiency, Parental behaviour, Physical Activity, Physical fitness, Self-perception",
author = "Kemi Wright and Bonnie Furzer and Melissa Licari and Ashleigh Thornton and James Dimmock and Louise Naylor and Siobhan Reid and Stephanie Kwan and Ben Jackson",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ridd.2018.05.013",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "66--74",
journal = "Research in Developmental Disabilities",
issn = "0891-4222",
publisher = "Pergamon",

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T1 - Physiological characteristics, self-perceptions, and parental support of physical activity in children with, or at risk of, developmental coordination disorder.

AU - Wright, Kemi

AU - Furzer, Bonnie

AU - Licari, Melissa

AU - Thornton, Ashleigh

AU - Dimmock, James

AU - Naylor, Louise

AU - Reid, Siobhan

AU - Kwan, Stephanie

AU - Jackson, Ben

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - Children with low movement proficiency have been identified as having poorer physiological and psychosocial outcomes; however, the varied measurement approaches used to assess these outcomes have varied resulting in conflicting evidence regarding the presence and magnitude of differences compared to Typically Developing (TD) children. Additionally, there has been limited research into the role of parental support for physical activity (PA) in this group. We compared children with varying levels of movement proficiency on physiological characteristics and self-perceptions regarding PA. In addition, these children's parents were compared on physiological characteristics and support of their children's PA. Children (N = 117) aged 6 to 12 years, along with their parent/guardian, participated in this study. Children were classified according to the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 test (Typically Developing (TD) = 60; At Risk = 19; Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) = 38). Children's PA, muscle strength, cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF), body composition, and self-perceptions regarding PA were assessed, with parents assessed on CRF, body composition, and PA support. Compared to TD children, children with DCD had lower PA (p = 0.036), predilection (p ≤0.001) and adequacy (p ≤0.001) regarding PA, higher body fat percentage (p = 0.019), and received less logistic support (i.e., transportation) from their parents (p = 0.012). TD children had increased muscle strength compared to the DCD (p ≤ 0.001) and At Risk (p ≤ 0.001) groups. Results indicated that, relative to TD children, children with DCD have multiple physiological deficits, receive less parental logistic support for PA involvement, and report lower scores on psychological constructs that are predictive of PA involvement.

AB - Children with low movement proficiency have been identified as having poorer physiological and psychosocial outcomes; however, the varied measurement approaches used to assess these outcomes have varied resulting in conflicting evidence regarding the presence and magnitude of differences compared to Typically Developing (TD) children. Additionally, there has been limited research into the role of parental support for physical activity (PA) in this group. We compared children with varying levels of movement proficiency on physiological characteristics and self-perceptions regarding PA. In addition, these children's parents were compared on physiological characteristics and support of their children's PA. Children (N = 117) aged 6 to 12 years, along with their parent/guardian, participated in this study. Children were classified according to the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 test (Typically Developing (TD) = 60; At Risk = 19; Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) = 38). Children's PA, muscle strength, cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF), body composition, and self-perceptions regarding PA were assessed, with parents assessed on CRF, body composition, and PA support. Compared to TD children, children with DCD had lower PA (p = 0.036), predilection (p ≤0.001) and adequacy (p ≤0.001) regarding PA, higher body fat percentage (p = 0.019), and received less logistic support (i.e., transportation) from their parents (p = 0.012). TD children had increased muscle strength compared to the DCD (p ≤ 0.001) and At Risk (p ≤ 0.001) groups. Results indicated that, relative to TD children, children with DCD have multiple physiological deficits, receive less parental logistic support for PA involvement, and report lower scores on psychological constructs that are predictive of PA involvement.

KW - Developmental coordination disorder

KW - movement proficiency

KW - Parental behaviour

KW - Physical Activity

KW - Physical fitness

KW - Self-perception

U2 - 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.05.013

DO - 10.1016/j.ridd.2018.05.013

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 66

EP - 74

JO - Research in Developmental Disabilities

JF - Research in Developmental Disabilities

SN - 0891-4222

ER -