Photo-biological response of phytoplankton communities to physical oceanographic forcing along the southern Kimberley coast, Western Australia

Martin McLaughlin

Research output: ThesisMaster's Thesis

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Abstract

The wide (~300 km) continental shelf of the southern Kimberley region of Western Australia results in the largest tropical tides in the world. In April/May (Austral autumn) 2010, transects from the estuarine waters of King Sound to the 1000 m isobath offshore were sampled during a four-week period. We examined phytoplankton biomass, production and photo-physiological responses to physical and chemical variables associated with the region's tidal forces. King Sound was found to be a productivity hotspot, with mixing processes causing phytoplankton throughout the area to employ different acclimation strategies to varying light at different phases of the spring-neap tidal cycle.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationMasters
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Ghadouani, Anas, Supervisor
  • Pattiaratchi, Charitha, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date23 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2019

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